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Small tips for what to see and where to eat.

Francesco

Small tips for what to see and where to eat.

Food Scene
Round pizzas and the blade produced with carefully selected ingredients and top quality
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Pizzeria da Simone Malatesta
2 Via Roberto Malatesta
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Round pizzas and the blade produced with carefully selected ingredients and top quality
In Rome, there was once a Ciriola, bread der Roman people ... For years now no longer found. But, if you come to visit us, we'll do eat us Ciriola with all the good products of Rome and Lazio.
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Dar Ciriola
2a Via Pausania
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In Rome, there was once a Ciriola, bread der Roman people ... For years now no longer found. But, if you come to visit us, we'll do eat us Ciriola with all the good products of Rome and Lazio.
Moussakà e ouzo tra sedie azzurre e dettagli marini in sale spaziose con musica tipica dal vivo nel weekend. Moussaka and ouzo among blue chairs and marine details in spacious rooms with traditional live music on weekends.
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Egeo
99 Via Augusto Dulceri
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Moussakà e ouzo tra sedie azzurre e dettagli marini in sale spaziose con musica tipica dal vivo nel weekend. Moussaka and ouzo among blue chairs and marine details in spacious rooms with traditional live music on weekends.
In the district it is one of the best cake shops-cafes.
Pastry Cafe Orsini
99 Via Erasmo Gattamelata
In the district it is one of the best cake shops-cafes.
Restaurant Pizzeria Il Gabbiano Al Pigneto in Rome is managed by schef-patron that as a characteristic to be little inclined to fads and ephemeral gastronomic exaltations. The restaurant philosophy is based on four pillars: Time, Territory, Tradition and Technique. The first pillar because the dishes proposed by the restaurant are seasonality to ensure the freshness of the products used; the dishes are treated with local products to respect the second pillar of the restaurant. The third pillar, Tradition, as they served traditional dishes of the best Italian regional cuisines such as Lucana, Napoletana, Siciliana, Ligure and Veneta. Telephone: 06 275 3350
Ristorante Pizzeria Il Gabbiano al Pigneto
75/81 Via Alberto da Giussano
Restaurant Pizzeria Il Gabbiano Al Pigneto in Rome is managed by schef-patron that as a characteristic to be little inclined to fads and ephemeral gastronomic exaltations. The restaurant philosophy is based on four pillars: Time, Territory, Tradition and Technique. The first pillar because the dishes proposed by the restaurant are seasonality to ensure the freshness of the products used; the dishes are treated with local products to respect the second pillar of the restaurant. The third pillar, Tradition, as they served traditional dishes of the best Italian regional cuisines such as Lucana, Napoletana, Siciliana, Ligure and Veneta. Telephone: 06 275 3350
Drinks & Nightlife
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Necci dal 1924
68 Via Fanfulla da Lodi
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Premiata panineria
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Un locale speciale che propone musica dal vivo unita alla possibilità di mangiare qualcosa di gustoso o bere un buon drink o del buon vino in compagnia.
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'na cosetta
54/A Via Ettore Giovenale
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Un locale speciale che propone musica dal vivo unita alla possibilità di mangiare qualcosa di gustoso o bere un buon drink o del buon vino in compagnia.
Spesso presente un DJ set o musica dal vivo, affacciato sulla movida dell'isola pedonale del Pigneto, il Cargo è un luogo storico e di riferimento per bere qualcosa in compagnia o anche da soli. Su richiesta aperitivo per celiaci
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Cargo
20 Via del Pigneto
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Spesso presente un DJ set o musica dal vivo, affacciato sulla movida dell'isola pedonale del Pigneto, il Cargo è un luogo storico e di riferimento per bere qualcosa in compagnia o anche da soli. Su richiesta aperitivo per celiaci
Sightseeing
Discover 2000 years of history when you visit the Basilica of San Clemente. Admire the spectacular mosaics and frescoes. Travel back in time to explore the Basilica of the fourth century and then descend into the world of Rome in the first century where there is still a pagan temple. Centuries of art and history waiting to be discovered! Official site of the Basilica: http://www.basilicasanclemente.com/eng/
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San Clemente
95 Via Labicana
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Discover 2000 years of history when you visit the Basilica of San Clemente. Admire the spectacular mosaics and frescoes. Travel back in time to explore the Basilica of the fourth century and then descend into the world of Rome in the first century where there is still a pagan temple. Centuries of art and history waiting to be discovered! Official site of the Basilica: http://www.basilicasanclemente.com/eng/
Referred to as the “Mother of all churches in the world”, the Basilica of St. John Lateran constitutes the perfect linkage between the pagan and Christian eras. Created, in fact, for public meetings and administering justice, with the spread of the new faith it was turned into a imposing ecclesiastical building, capable of welcoming a large congregation. The Basilica stands on the site of another built by the Emperor Constantine at around 314 A.D. in the grounds of the noble Laterani family, from whom the entire area gets its name. Repeatedly damaged (often as a result of fires) and restored, the basilica was embellished with a series of artistic treasures and adornments accumulated over the centuries. Behind Alessandro Galilei’s eighteenth century façade lies Borromini’s magnificent interior, commissioned by Pope Innocent X for the Jubilee Year in 1650. The whole five nave-structure has survived well-preserved through the ages, as indeed has the sumptuous sixteenth century coffered ceiling gilded with real gold in the central nave. Your stay should now continue with a visit to the museum, where a number of precious liturgical artefacts are kept, as well as to the cloisters, a masterpiece of the Cosmatesque style where relics of the architecture, sculptures and decorations of the ancient basilica are exhibited. http://www.turismoroma.it/cosa-fare/basilica-di-san-giovanni-in-laterano?lang=en
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Erzbasilika San Giovanni in Laterano
4 Piazza di S. Giovanni in Laterano
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Referred to as the “Mother of all churches in the world”, the Basilica of St. John Lateran constitutes the perfect linkage between the pagan and Christian eras. Created, in fact, for public meetings and administering justice, with the spread of the new faith it was turned into a imposing ecclesiastical building, capable of welcoming a large congregation. The Basilica stands on the site of another built by the Emperor Constantine at around 314 A.D. in the grounds of the noble Laterani family, from whom the entire area gets its name. Repeatedly damaged (often as a result of fires) and restored, the basilica was embellished with a series of artistic treasures and adornments accumulated over the centuries. Behind Alessandro Galilei’s eighteenth century façade lies Borromini’s magnificent interior, commissioned by Pope Innocent X for the Jubilee Year in 1650. The whole five nave-structure has survived well-preserved through the ages, as indeed has the sumptuous sixteenth century coffered ceiling gilded with real gold in the central nave. Your stay should now continue with a visit to the museum, where a number of precious liturgical artefacts are kept, as well as to the cloisters, a masterpiece of the Cosmatesque style where relics of the architecture, sculptures and decorations of the ancient basilica are exhibited. http://www.turismoroma.it/cosa-fare/basilica-di-san-giovanni-in-laterano?lang=en
VISIT THE COLOSSEUM The Colosseum is open to the public almost every day , except December 25, January 1 and May 1, with a time ranging from 9 in the morning to the afternoon - evening ( 17 in winter, 19:30 in summer) . Sometimes, they are also open to visitors on the third ring and the underground and in the summer , on some days of the week, You can visit the Flavian Amphitheatre even at night. The entrance fee is valid for 2 days and allows igresso also to the Roman Forum and the Palatine. Official website to book a visit to the Colosseum http://www.coopculture.it/en/colosseo-e-shop.cfm
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Coliseu
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VISIT THE COLOSSEUM The Colosseum is open to the public almost every day , except December 25, January 1 and May 1, with a time ranging from 9 in the morning to the afternoon - evening ( 17 in winter, 19:30 in summer) . Sometimes, they are also open to visitors on the third ring and the underground and in the summer , on some days of the week, You can visit the Flavian Amphitheatre even at night. The entrance fee is valid for 2 days and allows igresso also to the Roman Forum and the Palatine. Official website to book a visit to the Colosseum http://www.coopculture.it/en/colosseo-e-shop.cfm
In 1878, the Italian Parliament decided to dedicate a national monument to the newly deceased sovereign Victor Emanuel II. Having banned two international competitions (1880 and 1882), he was chosen the project by Giuseppe Sacconi. The young architect Marche, on the great classical age sanctuaries model, had conceived the space like a theatrical performance that celebrated in the center of Imperial Rome, the Italian Risorgimento. The architecture of the monument was developed as an ideal ascending path through the stairways and terraces, enriched by the different groups of sculptures and bas-reliefs of the central altar of the Fatherland, is it raised to the side Temples and from these the grand columned porch surmounted by bronze chariots , Unit allegories of the Fatherland and Freedom. Although initiated in 1885, the work proceeded slower and the project was continuously modified. The same material with which was to be built, travertine, was replaced with pure white botticino Brescia. Between 1885 and 1910, the entire area to the foot of the Capitol was affected by the new urban plan that saw the demolition of the existing medieval and Renaissance quarters. For a better view of the monument they were also moved to the Venice Palace and the Church of Santa Rita. On the death of Sacconi, in 1905, the work was directed by the architect Gaetano Koch, Manfredo Manfredi and Pio Piacentini. On June 4, 1911, for the International Exhibition for the fiftieth anniversary of the Unification of Italy, Vittorio Emanuele III inaugurated the great equestrian statue in gilded bronze. In 1921 in the crypt designed by Armando Brasini, he was buried the body of the Unknown Soldier. Between 1924 and 1927 on the Propylaea were positioned Unity Quadriga, of CarloFontana, and Quadriga of Liberty, Paolo Bartolini. Only in 1935, however, the work could be considered concluded.
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Monumento a Vittoria Emanuele Ⅱ
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In 1878, the Italian Parliament decided to dedicate a national monument to the newly deceased sovereign Victor Emanuel II. Having banned two international competitions (1880 and 1882), he was chosen the project by Giuseppe Sacconi. The young architect Marche, on the great classical age sanctuaries model, had conceived the space like a theatrical performance that celebrated in the center of Imperial Rome, the Italian Risorgimento. The architecture of the monument was developed as an ideal ascending path through the stairways and terraces, enriched by the different groups of sculptures and bas-reliefs of the central altar of the Fatherland, is it raised to the side Temples and from these the grand columned porch surmounted by bronze chariots , Unit allegories of the Fatherland and Freedom. Although initiated in 1885, the work proceeded slower and the project was continuously modified. The same material with which was to be built, travertine, was replaced with pure white botticino Brescia. Between 1885 and 1910, the entire area to the foot of the Capitol was affected by the new urban plan that saw the demolition of the existing medieval and Renaissance quarters. For a better view of the monument they were also moved to the Venice Palace and the Church of Santa Rita. On the death of Sacconi, in 1905, the work was directed by the architect Gaetano Koch, Manfredo Manfredi and Pio Piacentini. On June 4, 1911, for the International Exhibition for the fiftieth anniversary of the Unification of Italy, Vittorio Emanuele III inaugurated the great equestrian statue in gilded bronze. In 1921 in the crypt designed by Armando Brasini, he was buried the body of the Unknown Soldier. Between 1924 and 1927 on the Propylaea were positioned Unity Quadriga, of CarloFontana, and Quadriga of Liberty, Paolo Bartolini. Only in 1935, however, the work could be considered concluded.
Built around 123 A.D. as a tomb for Emperor Hadrian and his family, Castel Sant'Angelo has an unusual destiny in the historical and artistic capital of the scene. While all the other Roman monuments are overwhelmed, reduced to ruins or quarries to be recycled into new materials counting, modern buildings, the Castle - through an unbroken series of developments and transformations that seem to slip into each other seamlessly continuity - accompanies for almost two thousand years the fate and history of Rome. From funerary monument to a fortified outpost, from dark and terrible prison in splendid Renaissance residence which sees active among its walls Michelangelo, from the Risorgimento prison museum, Castel Sant'Angelo embodies the solemn Roman spaces, in the mighty walls, in the sumptuous frescoed halls, the events of the Eternal City where past and present seem inextricably linked. Switchboard tel. +39 06 6819111 TIMETABLES Every day from 9.00 to 19.30 Closed 25/12; 1/01. The ticket office closes at 18.30 RESERVATIONS Recommended for groups of 20 persons and for schools Optional for single Booking fee € 1.00 Online: http://www.gebart.it/ ENTRANCE Full price € 10,00 * Reduced € 5.00 * European Union citizens between 18 and 25 years, the role of teachers in state schools. Same conditions for citizens of non-EU countries "a condition of reciprocity" * The ticket price is subject to change during exhibitions You can also pay with Cash, Visa, MasterCard and Maestro Free: EU citizens and non-18s, students and accompanying teachers, students and faculty of Architecture, Arts (archaeological or historical and artistic), Conservation of Cultural Heritage and Education Sciences, the Academy of Fine Arts, employees of the Ministry heritage and Cultural Activities, ICOM members, tourist guides and interpreters in service, journalists with card order, school groups with a guide, by prior arrangement, the disabled with assistance. - See more at: http://castelsantangelo.beniculturali.it/#sthash.SHx7j888.dpuf
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Engelsburg
50 Lungotevere Castello
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Built around 123 A.D. as a tomb for Emperor Hadrian and his family, Castel Sant'Angelo has an unusual destiny in the historical and artistic capital of the scene. While all the other Roman monuments are overwhelmed, reduced to ruins or quarries to be recycled into new materials counting, modern buildings, the Castle - through an unbroken series of developments and transformations that seem to slip into each other seamlessly continuity - accompanies for almost two thousand years the fate and history of Rome. From funerary monument to a fortified outpost, from dark and terrible prison in splendid Renaissance residence which sees active among its walls Michelangelo, from the Risorgimento prison museum, Castel Sant'Angelo embodies the solemn Roman spaces, in the mighty walls, in the sumptuous frescoed halls, the events of the Eternal City where past and present seem inextricably linked. Switchboard tel. +39 06 6819111 TIMETABLES Every day from 9.00 to 19.30 Closed 25/12; 1/01. The ticket office closes at 18.30 RESERVATIONS Recommended for groups of 20 persons and for schools Optional for single Booking fee € 1.00 Online: http://www.gebart.it/ ENTRANCE Full price € 10,00 * Reduced € 5.00 * European Union citizens between 18 and 25 years, the role of teachers in state schools. Same conditions for citizens of non-EU countries "a condition of reciprocity" * The ticket price is subject to change during exhibitions You can also pay with Cash, Visa, MasterCard and Maestro Free: EU citizens and non-18s, students and accompanying teachers, students and faculty of Architecture, Arts (archaeological or historical and artistic), Conservation of Cultural Heritage and Education Sciences, the Academy of Fine Arts, employees of the Ministry heritage and Cultural Activities, ICOM members, tourist guides and interpreters in service, journalists with card order, school groups with a guide, by prior arrangement, the disabled with assistance. - See more at: http://castelsantangelo.beniculturali.it/#sthash.SHx7j888.dpuf
The Vatican Museums is one of the most important Museum complexes in the world housing very important masterpieces from the Egyptian Age to late Renaissance. The museums are composed of several sections: - the Gregorian Etruscan Museum - the Pinacoteca - the Missionary-Ethnological Museum - the Raphael Stanze - the Sistine Chapel. Official Site : http://www.rome-museum.com/
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Vatikanische Museen
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The Vatican Museums is one of the most important Museum complexes in the world housing very important masterpieces from the Egyptian Age to late Renaissance. The museums are composed of several sections: - the Gregorian Etruscan Museum - the Pinacoteca - the Missionary-Ethnological Museum - the Raphael Stanze - the Sistine Chapel. Official Site : http://www.rome-museum.com/
For an inexperienced eye the Circus Maximus now appears only as a large green area where the Romans are training or leading to the dogs for a walk, this grass oblong in antiquity was, as its name says, the most famous circus and by far the most ancient. The Circus Maximus was destined to sports and athletic competitions of various kinds, but became most famous for chariot races which often went on from early morning until dusk, up to a hundred a day. At peak times it could accommodate 250,000 to 300,000 people with standing room. Recent excavations have unearthed the remains that we beg to better delineate the ancient fattezza circus, a myriad of shops, stalls and taverns surrounding the area of racing. Go to
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Circus Maximus
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For an inexperienced eye the Circus Maximus now appears only as a large green area where the Romans are training or leading to the dogs for a walk, this grass oblong in antiquity was, as its name says, the most famous circus and by far the most ancient. The Circus Maximus was destined to sports and athletic competitions of various kinds, but became most famous for chariot races which often went on from early morning until dusk, up to a hundred a day. At peak times it could accommodate 250,000 to 300,000 people with standing room. Recent excavations have unearthed the remains that we beg to better delineate the ancient fattezza circus, a myriad of shops, stalls and taverns surrounding the area of racing. Go to
Visited in the vestibule of the church of the gate opening hours Winter hours: 9:30 to 17:00 hours (16:50 hours closing gate) Summer hours: 9:30 to 18:00 hours (17:50 hours closing gate)
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Bocca Della Verita'
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Visited in the vestibule of the church of the gate opening hours Winter hours: 9:30 to 17:00 hours (16:50 hours closing gate) Summer hours: 9:30 to 18:00 hours (17:50 hours closing gate)
The catacombs of St.Callixtus are among the greatest and most important of Rome. They originated about the middle of the second century and are part of a cemeterial complex. In it were buried tens of martyrs, 16 popes and very many Christians. They are named after the deacon Callixtus who, at the beginning of the third century, was appointed by pope Zephyrinus as the administrator of the cemetery and so the catacombs of St.Callixtus became the official cemetery of the Church of Rome. In the open area are two small basilicas with three apses, known as the "Trichorae". In the Eastern one were perhaps laid to rest pope Zephyrinus and the young martyr of the Eucharist, St.Tarcisius. The underground cemetery includes several areas. The Crypts of Lucina and the area of the Popes and of St.Cecilia are the most ancient areas. http://www.catacombe.roma.it/en/index.php
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Calixtus - Katakombe
110/126 Via Appia Antica
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The catacombs of St.Callixtus are among the greatest and most important of Rome. They originated about the middle of the second century and are part of a cemeterial complex. In it were buried tens of martyrs, 16 popes and very many Christians. They are named after the deacon Callixtus who, at the beginning of the third century, was appointed by pope Zephyrinus as the administrator of the cemetery and so the catacombs of St.Callixtus became the official cemetery of the Church of Rome. In the open area are two small basilicas with three apses, known as the "Trichorae". In the Eastern one were perhaps laid to rest pope Zephyrinus and the young martyr of the Eucharist, St.Tarcisius. The underground cemetery includes several areas. The Crypts of Lucina and the area of the Popes and of St.Cecilia are the most ancient areas. http://www.catacombe.roma.it/en/index.php
The Catacombs of St. Domitilla, as we know them, are spread over 17 kilometers of underground caves, some of which are inaccessible. They are laid out on four levels - one on top of another. The catacombs of the Eternal City offer one of the most complete and eloquent pictures of the Christian community in Imperial Rome, and of Catholicism in the city between the 2nd and 9th centuries. Until the 2nd century, in fact, the early Christians didn’t have their own cemeteries but were buried alongside the pagans in communal burial grounds outside the city along the main consular roads. The Apostle Peter was buried on the Vatican hill and St. Paul along the road to Ostia. http://www.domitilla.info/idx.htm?var1=docs/en01.htm
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Domitilla-Katakomben
282 Via delle Sette Chiese
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The Catacombs of St. Domitilla, as we know them, are spread over 17 kilometers of underground caves, some of which are inaccessible. They are laid out on four levels - one on top of another. The catacombs of the Eternal City offer one of the most complete and eloquent pictures of the Christian community in Imperial Rome, and of Catholicism in the city between the 2nd and 9th centuries. Until the 2nd century, in fact, the early Christians didn’t have their own cemeteries but were buried alongside the pagans in communal burial grounds outside the city along the main consular roads. The Apostle Peter was buried on the Vatican hill and St. Paul along the road to Ostia. http://www.domitilla.info/idx.htm?var1=docs/en01.htm
Excavated between the 3rd and 5th centuries AD, the Catacombs of the SS. Marcellinus and Peter hosted very rich Christians who left to posterity wonderful frescoes, now brought back to their original splendor through the laser technique. With its 18 thousand square meters and its 16 meters of depth these catacombs represent a real treasure of the underground Christian Rome. email: santimarcellinoepietro@gmail.com mobile: +39 339 65 28 887 (Info & Reservations) tel .: +39 06 24 194 46
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Saint Marcellino and Pietro's Catacombs
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Excavated between the 3rd and 5th centuries AD, the Catacombs of the SS. Marcellinus and Peter hosted very rich Christians who left to posterity wonderful frescoes, now brought back to their original splendor through the laser technique. With its 18 thousand square meters and its 16 meters of depth these catacombs represent a real treasure of the underground Christian Rome. email: santimarcellinoepietro@gmail.com mobile: +39 339 65 28 887 (Info & Reservations) tel .: +39 06 24 194 46
The Museum of the Walls is located in Porta San Sebastiano, one of the largest and best preserved parts of the Aurelian Walls. The current display, on the first and second floors, opened in 1990 and is divided into three sections - ancient, mediaeval and modern, each with explanatory texts, drawings and photographs. The display narrates the history of the city's fortifications. It starts with those built under the kings of Rome, then those under the Republic, before discussing the walls built by Marcus Aurelius in the third century BC. The historical and political events that led to the building of the Aurelian walls are detailed, as well as the strategic considerations that led to them being built where they were. There is a further analysis of the building techniques used, including door types, as well as subsequent restorations and transformations. The circular hall on the first floor contains models of the various construction phases of the Aurelian Walls, and a three dimensional plan of Rome, showing the layout of its fortifications. In the mediaeval and modern sections, found on the second floor, the historical and architectural events that befell the Aurelian Walls are narrated, tracing how in mediaeval times the relation of the walls to the city changed as the population dwindled. On the walls of the two rooms in the museum are hung plaster casts of the crosses cut into the stone above the entrance arches of some of the doors. The casts also illustrate the crosses, palmettes and wheel patterns made with bricks by the workmen during the building of the walls. The terrace on the central section between the gateway's two towers and that in the western tower are also accessible to visitors.
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Museo delle Mura
18 Via di Porta San Sebastiano
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The Museum of the Walls is located in Porta San Sebastiano, one of the largest and best preserved parts of the Aurelian Walls. The current display, on the first and second floors, opened in 1990 and is divided into three sections - ancient, mediaeval and modern, each with explanatory texts, drawings and photographs. The display narrates the history of the city's fortifications. It starts with those built under the kings of Rome, then those under the Republic, before discussing the walls built by Marcus Aurelius in the third century BC. The historical and political events that led to the building of the Aurelian walls are detailed, as well as the strategic considerations that led to them being built where they were. There is a further analysis of the building techniques used, including door types, as well as subsequent restorations and transformations. The circular hall on the first floor contains models of the various construction phases of the Aurelian Walls, and a three dimensional plan of Rome, showing the layout of its fortifications. In the mediaeval and modern sections, found on the second floor, the historical and architectural events that befell the Aurelian Walls are narrated, tracing how in mediaeval times the relation of the walls to the city changed as the population dwindled. On the walls of the two rooms in the museum are hung plaster casts of the crosses cut into the stone above the entrance arches of some of the doors. The casts also illustrate the crosses, palmettes and wheel patterns made with bricks by the workmen during the building of the walls. The terrace on the central section between the gateway's two towers and that in the western tower are also accessible to visitors.
One of the oldest parishes of Rome, represents a splendid example of Renaissance architecture, with a treasure to be discovered. The church of Santa Maria del Popolo is located at the north of the homonymous square, adjacent to the ancient Porta Flaminia. It 'a church rich in history and masterpieces: according to tradition in this outlying area almost deserted arise the tomb of the Domitii family where he was buried the emperor Nero. It was Pope Paschal II in 1099 to start the construction of a chapel there where now stands Santa Maria del Popolo to celebrate the liberation of the Holy Sepulchre in the crusades, although legend has it (as shown on the arch which surmounts the altar) that the Virgin appeared in a dream to the Pope to tell him to build a chapel right there where he was buried the nefarious Emperor whose ghost haunted the area. In 1235 Pope Gregory IX transferred there from the Lateran the image of the Virgin painted according to tradition by St. Luke, still on the high altar, while the chapel was converted into a church for the provisional settlement of the Franciscans. The religious complex in 1250 it passed to the Order of the Augustinians of Tuscia and in 1472 to that of the Lombard Congregation, which will rework the church in Lombard style. In the second half of the fifteenth century the church was completely rebuilt by order of Pope Sixtus IV Della Rovere, becoming one of the first Renaissance churches. Already in 1500 there were the first interventions and remakes, Bramante built the choir apse-shaped shell while Raphael's Chigi Chapel was dedicated to the project. In this period there are many artists with their works have left an important examples of Renaissance art in Rome: starting from 1490 Bernardino di Betto, called "Pinturicchio" begins the decoration of the chapel Della Rovere and together with his workshop will proceed to decorate with frescoes many of the chapels of Santa Maria del Popolo culminating in the spectacular fresco of the vault of the presbytery. In the following century Pope Alexander VII Chigi commissioned restoration and embellishment of the building to Gian Lorenzo Bernini, the greatest architect and sculptor of that century. Bernini worked there with his workshop, partially amending the original Renaissance structure. of the nineteenth century, the fifteenth monastery was destroyed to make way to the square by the architect Italian Giuseppe Valadier. The interior of the basilica is divided into three naves, with four chapels on each side and ends with a large transept, onto which four chapels, a dome and the priest. The most famous chapels are the Chigi Chapel, designed by Raphael for Agostino Chigi between 1513 and 1514 and restored by Bernini from 1652 to 1656; and the Cerasi Chapel, with The Crucifixion of St. Peter (1601) and The Conversion of St. Paul (1600- 1601) by Caravaggio, and The Assumption of the Virgin by Annibale.
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Santa Maria del Popolo
12 Piazza del Popolo
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One of the oldest parishes of Rome, represents a splendid example of Renaissance architecture, with a treasure to be discovered. The church of Santa Maria del Popolo is located at the north of the homonymous square, adjacent to the ancient Porta Flaminia. It 'a church rich in history and masterpieces: according to tradition in this outlying area almost deserted arise the tomb of the Domitii family where he was buried the emperor Nero. It was Pope Paschal II in 1099 to start the construction of a chapel there where now stands Santa Maria del Popolo to celebrate the liberation of the Holy Sepulchre in the crusades, although legend has it (as shown on the arch which surmounts the altar) that the Virgin appeared in a dream to the Pope to tell him to build a chapel right there where he was buried the nefarious Emperor whose ghost haunted the area. In 1235 Pope Gregory IX transferred there from the Lateran the image of the Virgin painted according to tradition by St. Luke, still on the high altar, while the chapel was converted into a church for the provisional settlement of the Franciscans. The religious complex in 1250 it passed to the Order of the Augustinians of Tuscia and in 1472 to that of the Lombard Congregation, which will rework the church in Lombard style. In the second half of the fifteenth century the church was completely rebuilt by order of Pope Sixtus IV Della Rovere, becoming one of the first Renaissance churches. Already in 1500 there were the first interventions and remakes, Bramante built the choir apse-shaped shell while Raphael's Chigi Chapel was dedicated to the project. In this period there are many artists with their works have left an important examples of Renaissance art in Rome: starting from 1490 Bernardino di Betto, called "Pinturicchio" begins the decoration of the chapel Della Rovere and together with his workshop will proceed to decorate with frescoes many of the chapels of Santa Maria del Popolo culminating in the spectacular fresco of the vault of the presbytery. In the following century Pope Alexander VII Chigi commissioned restoration and embellishment of the building to Gian Lorenzo Bernini, the greatest architect and sculptor of that century. Bernini worked there with his workshop, partially amending the original Renaissance structure. of the nineteenth century, the fifteenth monastery was destroyed to make way to the square by the architect Italian Giuseppe Valadier. The interior of the basilica is divided into three naves, with four chapels on each side and ends with a large transept, onto which four chapels, a dome and the priest. The most famous chapels are the Chigi Chapel, designed by Raphael for Agostino Chigi between 1513 and 1514 and restored by Bernini from 1652 to 1656; and the Cerasi Chapel, with The Crucifixion of St. Peter (1601) and The Conversion of St. Paul (1600- 1601) by Caravaggio, and The Assumption of the Virgin by Annibale.
The Patriarchal Basilica of St. Mary Major reigns as an authentic jewel in the crown of Roman churches. Its beautiful treasures are of inestimable value, and represent the Church's role as the cradle of Christian artistic civilization in Rome. For nearly sixteen centuries, St. Mary Major has held its position as a Marian shrine par excellence and has been a magnet for pilgrims from all over the world who have come to the Eternal City to experience the beauty, grandeur and holiness of the basilica. Among the Patriarchal Basilicas of Rome, St. Mary Major is the only one to have kept its original structure, though it has been enhanced over the course of years. Special details within the church render it unique including the fifth century mosaics of the central nave, the triumphal arch dating back to the pontificate of Pope Sixtus III (432-440) and the apsidal mosaic executed by the Franciscan friar Jacopo Torriti at the order of Pope Nicholas IV (1288-1292). Other gems of the church include the Cosmatesque pavement donated by the Roman nobleman Scoto Paparone and his son in 1288, Arnolfo di Cambio's Nativity scene from the thirteenth century and the coffered ceiling in gilt wood designed by Giuliano Sangallo in 1450. The numerous chapels, from the most ornate to the most humble, constructed by popes, cardinals and pious confraternities, the high altar begun by Ferdinando Fuga and later enriched by the genius of Valadier, the Baptistery and finally the relic of the Holy Crib complete the array of splendors contained within these walls. Every column, painting, sculpture and ornament of this basilica resonates with history and pious sentiment. From the devout pilgrim absorbed in prayer to the studious art-lover, every visitor to St. Mary Major finds both spiritual and visual fulfillment in this holy place. A visit to the Liberian basilica, as it is also called in honor of Pope Liberius, enriches both the mind and soul. Indeed, it is not uncommon to see visitors rapt in admiration before the spellbinding beauty of the artwork nor, at the same time, to observe the devotion of all those engrossed in prayer in search of comfort and assistance before the image of Mary, who is venerated here under the beloved title of Salus Populi Romani. Every August 5th, a solemn celebration recalls the Miracle of the Snows. Before the amazed eyes of the congregation, a cascade of white petals descends from the coffered ceiling, blanketing the hypogeum. From the very beginning of his pontificate, Pope John Paul II requested that an oil lamp burn day and night under the icon of the Salus Populi Romani, as witness to his great devotion to the Madonna. This same Pope, on the eighth of December 2001, inaugurated another precious jewel of the basilica - the museum, where a modern structure would house ancient masterpieces offering visitors a unique perspective of the history of the Basilica. The numerous treasures contained in the museum render St. Mary Major a place where art and spirituality combine in a perfect union, offering visitors a unique experience in contemplating the great works of man inspired by God. http://www.vatican.va/various/basiliche/sm_maggiore/index_en.html
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S. Maria Maggiore
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The Patriarchal Basilica of St. Mary Major reigns as an authentic jewel in the crown of Roman churches. Its beautiful treasures are of inestimable value, and represent the Church's role as the cradle of Christian artistic civilization in Rome. For nearly sixteen centuries, St. Mary Major has held its position as a Marian shrine par excellence and has been a magnet for pilgrims from all over the world who have come to the Eternal City to experience the beauty, grandeur and holiness of the basilica. Among the Patriarchal Basilicas of Rome, St. Mary Major is the only one to have kept its original structure, though it has been enhanced over the course of years. Special details within the church render it unique including the fifth century mosaics of the central nave, the triumphal arch dating back to the pontificate of Pope Sixtus III (432-440) and the apsidal mosaic executed by the Franciscan friar Jacopo Torriti at the order of Pope Nicholas IV (1288-1292). Other gems of the church include the Cosmatesque pavement donated by the Roman nobleman Scoto Paparone and his son in 1288, Arnolfo di Cambio's Nativity scene from the thirteenth century and the coffered ceiling in gilt wood designed by Giuliano Sangallo in 1450. The numerous chapels, from the most ornate to the most humble, constructed by popes, cardinals and pious confraternities, the high altar begun by Ferdinando Fuga and later enriched by the genius of Valadier, the Baptistery and finally the relic of the Holy Crib complete the array of splendors contained within these walls. Every column, painting, sculpture and ornament of this basilica resonates with history and pious sentiment. From the devout pilgrim absorbed in prayer to the studious art-lover, every visitor to St. Mary Major finds both spiritual and visual fulfillment in this holy place. A visit to the Liberian basilica, as it is also called in honor of Pope Liberius, enriches both the mind and soul. Indeed, it is not uncommon to see visitors rapt in admiration before the spellbinding beauty of the artwork nor, at the same time, to observe the devotion of all those engrossed in prayer in search of comfort and assistance before the image of Mary, who is venerated here under the beloved title of Salus Populi Romani. Every August 5th, a solemn celebration recalls the Miracle of the Snows. Before the amazed eyes of the congregation, a cascade of white petals descends from the coffered ceiling, blanketing the hypogeum. From the very beginning of his pontificate, Pope John Paul II requested that an oil lamp burn day and night under the icon of the Salus Populi Romani, as witness to his great devotion to the Madonna. This same Pope, on the eighth of December 2001, inaugurated another precious jewel of the basilica - the museum, where a modern structure would house ancient masterpieces offering visitors a unique perspective of the history of the Basilica. The numerous treasures contained in the museum render St. Mary Major a place where art and spirituality combine in a perfect union, offering visitors a unique experience in contemplating the great works of man inspired by God. http://www.vatican.va/various/basiliche/sm_maggiore/index_en.html
Palazzo Farnese , one of the finest Renaissance palaces in Rome was begun in 1514 by Antonio Sangallo , continued by Michelangelo and completed by Giacomo della Porta . The palace belonged to one of the most famous families of Renaissance Rome and today is home to the French Embassy . To make the visit must book early , from 1 to 4 months prior to the second of the season and the number of people , the visits are in French , in Italian and in English. Therefore , they are not allowed interpreters for other languages ​​. Reservations can be both individual and for groups of up to 20 people . For the same organization ( cultural association , universities and / or person) one visit a year is granted . For the visit it is important to obtain a valid identity card ( no photocopies ) . photographs and films are not allowed and bags and bulky items are not permitted ( either custody or closet ) . Piazza Farnese , 67 Email : visite-farnese@inventerrome.com Fax : 0039 0668601460 Online booking : www.inventerrome.com Website : www.ambafrance-it.org Phone : 0039 06 686011 (switchboard )
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Palazzo Farnese
67 Piazza Farnese
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Palazzo Farnese , one of the finest Renaissance palaces in Rome was begun in 1514 by Antonio Sangallo , continued by Michelangelo and completed by Giacomo della Porta . The palace belonged to one of the most famous families of Renaissance Rome and today is home to the French Embassy . To make the visit must book early , from 1 to 4 months prior to the second of the season and the number of people , the visits are in French , in Italian and in English. Therefore , they are not allowed interpreters for other languages ​​. Reservations can be both individual and for groups of up to 20 people . For the same organization ( cultural association , universities and / or person) one visit a year is granted . For the visit it is important to obtain a valid identity card ( no photocopies ) . photographs and films are not allowed and bags and bulky items are not permitted ( either custody or closet ) . Piazza Farnese , 67 Email : visite-farnese@inventerrome.com Fax : 0039 0668601460 Online booking : www.inventerrome.com Website : www.ambafrance-it.org Phone : 0039 06 686011 (switchboard )
The Cerveteri Necropolis is the most imposing in all Etruria and one of the most magnificent in the entire Mediterranean basin. You can get lost as you wander the streets of this “city of the dead”, enter its houses and take a trip back in time, aided by the multimedia installations that use audiovisual projections, virtual reconstructions, sound and light effects and 3D videos to show you how the tombs would have looked more than two thousand years ago, reproducing the atmospheres of the day and the treasures they conceal. http://www.tarquinia-cerveteri.it/en
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Necropolis Banditaccia
43/45 Via della Necropoli
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The Cerveteri Necropolis is the most imposing in all Etruria and one of the most magnificent in the entire Mediterranean basin. You can get lost as you wander the streets of this “city of the dead”, enter its houses and take a trip back in time, aided by the multimedia installations that use audiovisual projections, virtual reconstructions, sound and light effects and 3D videos to show you how the tombs would have looked more than two thousand years ago, reproducing the atmospheres of the day and the treasures they conceal. http://www.tarquinia-cerveteri.it/en
Shopping
Dior, Gucci, Valentino, Hermes, Armani, Jimmy Choo, La Perla, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Furla, Burberry, Celine, Dolce e Gabbana, Max Mara, Alberta Ferretti, Fornarina, Trussardi, Buccellati, Bulgari, Tod's, Cartier, Bally, Montblanc, Louis Vuitton
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Via Condotti
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Dior, Gucci, Valentino, Hermes, Armani, Jimmy Choo, La Perla, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Furla, Burberry, Celine, Dolce e Gabbana, Max Mara, Alberta Ferretti, Fornarina, Trussardi, Buccellati, Bulgari, Tod's, Cartier, Bally, Montblanc, Louis Vuitton
Essentials
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Il Castoro
118 Via Erasmo Gattamelata
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Pharmacy
Farmacia D'Eramo Marco Nicolò
38 Piazza Roberto Malatesta
Pharmacy
Parks & Nature
Save the Park is a vast archaeological and natural area. The area is characterized by the presence of seven aqueducts, and other ancient buildings such as the villa of Vignacce and Roma Vecchia farmhouse. The aqueducts are those Anio Vetus and Anio Novus, Marcia, of Tepula, Iulia, the Aqua Claudia and the Felice, the latter from the Renaissance period. It was built by Sixtus V in 1585 using the arches aqueduct Marcio, and is still working. In via Quadraro, where you can admire the aqueduct Claudio arches here reach their maximum height (27-28 meters), recent excavations have brought to light a number of facilities including some tombs, a building identified as a temple or mausoleum, a small columbarium, remains of the paving of Latin and a hotel with spa facility via (mansio). All these structures are currently not visible because covered. The villa dictates Vignacce is one of the largest suburban villas of this area; dated between the second and fourth centuries AD, was probably built by Q. Servilius Pudens, wealthy producer of bricks in the time of Hadrian (117-138 AD), as they seem to demonstrate some brick stamps and lead pipes (fistulae) bearing the his name, found in the excavations. The preserved remains of the villa refer to a large spa complex and a cistern with two floors, fed by the nearby aqueduct Marcio. The Casale di Roma Vecchia, and the location in which is named after the nearby villa of the Seven Netherlands because, given the large scale of the ruins, in the eighteenth century it was believed that they belonged to another ancient city like Rome. It is a house-tower, on the Via Latina, probably on the site of a former coaching inn, dating back to the thirteenth century. The house is located in a strategic position, between the aqueducts Aqua Claudia and Marcia. Next to the Old Casale di Roma runs the Acqua Mariana, Marrano said in the Middle Ages. It is a ditch for much of the open sky, made by Callistus II in 1120 to bring water to Rome of the aqueducts Aqua Tepula and Iulia. Since then the "Marrano" term refers to Rome all the ditches in the suburbs. Ditch next to the remains of a medieval tower of the thirteenth century, built on a Roman cistern. Later, between the Claudian aqueduct and the Roma-Cassino railway, is the so-called "tomb of a hundred steps", so called from the number of steps leading to the burial chamber; Here, within certain niches (arcosolia) are of marble sarcophagi with sloping lid; Some tunnels were later excavated the tomb, probably to be used as catacombs. At the Lemonia access via 256 is the Information Point area, open on Sundays; access to the park can also occur from other points.
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Parco degli Acquedotti
221 Via Lemonia
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Save the Park is a vast archaeological and natural area. The area is characterized by the presence of seven aqueducts, and other ancient buildings such as the villa of Vignacce and Roma Vecchia farmhouse. The aqueducts are those Anio Vetus and Anio Novus, Marcia, of Tepula, Iulia, the Aqua Claudia and the Felice, the latter from the Renaissance period. It was built by Sixtus V in 1585 using the arches aqueduct Marcio, and is still working. In via Quadraro, where you can admire the aqueduct Claudio arches here reach their maximum height (27-28 meters), recent excavations have brought to light a number of facilities including some tombs, a building identified as a temple or mausoleum, a small columbarium, remains of the paving of Latin and a hotel with spa facility via (mansio). All these structures are currently not visible because covered. The villa dictates Vignacce is one of the largest suburban villas of this area; dated between the second and fourth centuries AD, was probably built by Q. Servilius Pudens, wealthy producer of bricks in the time of Hadrian (117-138 AD), as they seem to demonstrate some brick stamps and lead pipes (fistulae) bearing the his name, found in the excavations. The preserved remains of the villa refer to a large spa complex and a cistern with two floors, fed by the nearby aqueduct Marcio. The Casale di Roma Vecchia, and the location in which is named after the nearby villa of the Seven Netherlands because, given the large scale of the ruins, in the eighteenth century it was believed that they belonged to another ancient city like Rome. It is a house-tower, on the Via Latina, probably on the site of a former coaching inn, dating back to the thirteenth century. The house is located in a strategic position, between the aqueducts Aqua Claudia and Marcia. Next to the Old Casale di Roma runs the Acqua Mariana, Marrano said in the Middle Ages. It is a ditch for much of the open sky, made by Callistus II in 1120 to bring water to Rome of the aqueducts Aqua Tepula and Iulia. Since then the "Marrano" term refers to Rome all the ditches in the suburbs. Ditch next to the remains of a medieval tower of the thirteenth century, built on a Roman cistern. Later, between the Claudian aqueduct and the Roma-Cassino railway, is the so-called "tomb of a hundred steps", so called from the number of steps leading to the burial chamber; Here, within certain niches (arcosolia) are of marble sarcophagi with sloping lid; Some tunnels were later excavated the tomb, probably to be used as catacombs. At the Lemonia access via 256 is the Information Point area, open on Sundays; access to the park can also occur from other points.
A long story that winds through the ages : with its 2300 years of history , the Appia Antica shows intact the signs of an illustrious and fascinating past , still visible in the ruins that overlook the roadside . Episodes of the great history and daily life echo in this idyllic setting since the days of ancient Rome , in a continuous swing between the " dark ages" of the Middle Ages , through the Renaissance , until the realization of open-air museum wanted by Pope Pius IX in the mid-nineteenth century . Here you can rent a bike to tackle the Appia Antica http://www.infopointappia.it/shop/it/
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Appia Antica Regional Park
42 Via Appia Antica
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A long story that winds through the ages : with its 2300 years of history , the Appia Antica shows intact the signs of an illustrious and fascinating past , still visible in the ruins that overlook the roadside . Episodes of the great history and daily life echo in this idyllic setting since the days of ancient Rome , in a continuous swing between the " dark ages" of the Middle Ages , through the Renaissance , until the realization of open-air museum wanted by Pope Pius IX in the mid-nineteenth century . Here you can rent a bike to tackle the Appia Antica http://www.infopointappia.it/shop/it/