Zu Inhalten springen

Catherine’s guidebook to St John

Catherine

Catherine’s guidebook to St John

Food scene
A St John MUST! Opened in May 1991 and offers burgers in paradise! Has a nice souvenir and beach shop too!
24
Einheimische empfehlen
Skinny Legs
9901 Estate Emmaus
24
Einheimische empfehlen
A St John MUST! Opened in May 1991 and offers burgers in paradise! Has a nice souvenir and beach shop too!
Local Virgin Island cuisine plus unforgettable views of Friis Bay! Open Mic night on Wednesdays is a must! If you go for Sunday brunch (and you should), go early!
10
Einheimische empfehlen
Miss Lucy's
10
Einheimische empfehlen
Local Virgin Island cuisine plus unforgettable views of Friis Bay! Open Mic night on Wednesdays is a must! If you go for Sunday brunch (and you should), go early!
Asian fusion restaurant offering half priced food and drinks for HAPPY HOUR (5pm-6pm). Live, local music on occasion. Check out their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/indigogrillstjohn/
Rhumb Lines
Asian fusion restaurant offering half priced food and drinks for HAPPY HOUR (5pm-6pm). Live, local music on occasion. Check out their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/indigogrillstjohn/
A floating taco boat that is accessible by water.
Lime Out VI
A floating taco boat that is accessible by water.
Beaches
Want to swim with the turtles? Then go to Maho. The near 100% chance to see a turtle and its convenience make Maho a favorite. The water has a shallow entrance with a sandy bottom and there is parking (plentiful by Saint John standards) making unloading cooler, chairs, snorkel gear and kids floaties a breeze! There are bathrooms on the western end of the beach and a food truck and watersports equipment for rent across the street. Go to Maho Crossroads, USVI Facebook Page for more information!
Maho Bay Beach
Want to swim with the turtles? Then go to Maho. The near 100% chance to see a turtle and its convenience make Maho a favorite. The water has a shallow entrance with a sandy bottom and there is parking (plentiful by Saint John standards) making unloading cooler, chairs, snorkel gear and kids floaties a breeze! There are bathrooms on the western end of the beach and a food truck and watersports equipment for rent across the street. Go to Maho Crossroads, USVI Facebook Page for more information!
The most renowned and photographed beach on the island and probably the Caribbean! Trunk boasts over a quarter of a mile of white sandy beach and a 225-yard-long underwater snorkel trail. The beach has accessible paths and beach ramps, snack shack, bar, snorkel gear rentals, a beach shop, restrooms, and showers. Trunk is the only beach on the island with a lifeguard. For more information on Trunk Bay amenities, visit cinnamonbayresort.com. The downside to Trunk is it is a popular cruise ship destination, so it is often crowded and there is a $5 entrance fee charged by the National Park system.
10
Einheimische empfehlen
Trunk Bay
10
Einheimische empfehlen
The most renowned and photographed beach on the island and probably the Caribbean! Trunk boasts over a quarter of a mile of white sandy beach and a 225-yard-long underwater snorkel trail. The beach has accessible paths and beach ramps, snack shack, bar, snorkel gear rentals, a beach shop, restrooms, and showers. Trunk is the only beach on the island with a lifeguard. For more information on Trunk Bay amenities, visit cinnamonbayresort.com. The downside to Trunk is it is a popular cruise ship destination, so it is often crowded and there is a $5 entrance fee charged by the National Park system.
One of the largest beaches (and in my opinion the most beautiful) on Saint John and, until Irmaria, Cinnamon Bay was the home of Cinnamon Bay Resort and Campground which offered tropical cottages, deluxe eco-tents, platform tent sites and bare sites, as well as shops and a café. It is currently being rebuilt. In the meantime, you’ll find white sand, palm trees, seagrapes for shade and some good shallow water snorkeling. Across the road, is the Cinnamon Bay Nature Trail. The trail is a half mile loop (a mixture of boardwalks and paved paths with no steep hills) winding through the ruins of a sugar factory. There are signs along the path that explain the history of the area.
Cinnamon Bay Beach
One of the largest beaches (and in my opinion the most beautiful) on Saint John and, until Irmaria, Cinnamon Bay was the home of Cinnamon Bay Resort and Campground which offered tropical cottages, deluxe eco-tents, platform tent sites and bare sites, as well as shops and a café. It is currently being rebuilt. In the meantime, you’ll find white sand, palm trees, seagrapes for shade and some good shallow water snorkeling. Across the road, is the Cinnamon Bay Nature Trail. The trail is a half mile loop (a mixture of boardwalks and paved paths with no steep hills) winding through the ruins of a sugar factory. There are signs along the path that explain the history of the area.
Salt Pond Bay – is secluded, beautiful, and an adventurer’s dream. A quarter of a mile hike downhill (uphill on the way back) takes you to Salt Pond Bay which is a top destination for snorkelers. The waves increase as you swim out so know your limits; there is a rocky outcrop to the right with good snorkeling. When you are done swimming, you can hike 2.2 miles round trip to the immense Ram’s Head Point that offers incredible views (you can see St Croix on a clear day) and sunsets. There is a port-a-potty at Salt Pond Bay.
7
Einheimische empfehlen
Salt Pond Beach
7
Einheimische empfehlen
Salt Pond Bay – is secluded, beautiful, and an adventurer’s dream. A quarter of a mile hike downhill (uphill on the way back) takes you to Salt Pond Bay which is a top destination for snorkelers. The waves increase as you swim out so know your limits; there is a rocky outcrop to the right with good snorkeling. When you are done swimming, you can hike 2.2 miles round trip to the immense Ram’s Head Point that offers incredible views (you can see St Croix on a clear day) and sunsets. There is a port-a-potty at Salt Pond Bay.
Are you ready to go off road? If your rental (must have high clearance) allows it, head to Lameshur which has two pretty bays side by side. The first Bay is Great Lameshur. The beach is rocky so not good for relaxing but for accomplished snorkelers, hike or swim about 300-400 yards along the eastern edge. There are deeper rock walls and I once saw an octopus fighting to eat a conch. I also saw a hawksbill turtle in the middle of the bay. For the better beach, head to Little Lameshur. A short swim from the shoreline and to the west is a small rocky outcropping in shallow water. This is a great place for beginners to explore. Snorkeling along the eastern side of Lameshur you’ll find a nice mix of shallow and deeper water structure. If you are a very good swimmer, swim WAY out to the left at the rocky outcrop (Yawzi Point). The coral and fish are so vibrant and plentiful that you feel like you are swimming in an aquarium. The water can be choppy and there is a 5-foot reef shark that likes to hang out there. If you continue down the dirt road, there is a sugar mill ruin. This is also the start (or end) of several of St Johns best hiking trails. The Bordeaux Mountain Trail leads you to the highest point on St John and gains almost 1,300 feet of elevation in about one mile.
Lameshur Beach
Are you ready to go off road? If your rental (must have high clearance) allows it, head to Lameshur which has two pretty bays side by side. The first Bay is Great Lameshur. The beach is rocky so not good for relaxing but for accomplished snorkelers, hike or swim about 300-400 yards along the eastern edge. There are deeper rock walls and I once saw an octopus fighting to eat a conch. I also saw a hawksbill turtle in the middle of the bay. For the better beach, head to Little Lameshur. A short swim from the shoreline and to the west is a small rocky outcropping in shallow water. This is a great place for beginners to explore. Snorkeling along the eastern side of Lameshur you’ll find a nice mix of shallow and deeper water structure. If you are a very good swimmer, swim WAY out to the left at the rocky outcrop (Yawzi Point). The coral and fish are so vibrant and plentiful that you feel like you are swimming in an aquarium. The water can be choppy and there is a 5-foot reef shark that likes to hang out there. If you continue down the dirt road, there is a sugar mill ruin. This is also the start (or end) of several of St Johns best hiking trails. The Bordeaux Mountain Trail leads you to the highest point on St John and gains almost 1,300 feet of elevation in about one mile.
Hikes
Love this hike! Wear tennis shoes and bring water! If you are at all interested in learning about the history of St. John as well as the flora and fauna, I recommend signing up for the Reef Bay Hike through the National Park. Not only will the Park Service shuttle you to the trailhead, they will lead you on a very informative 2.5 mile hike that is downhill. Then you will be shuttled back via boat. We took our 5 kids on this hike when the youngest was 6. She had no issues and was awarded the Junior Ranger badge at the end. Go to the National Park website to sign-up https://www.nps.gov/viis/planyourvisit/rangerguidedtours.htm. There is a fee and reservations strongly encouraged as this is a popular guided tour. If you choose not to go through the park service, it is a 2.5 mile down and 2.5 back UP hike (5 miles total), 1,184 foot elevation climb. The Reef Bay Trail begins at Centerline Road 4.9 miles east of Cruz Bay. Parking for four or five vehicles is available opposite the trail entrance. The trail was once a donkey path that was used to transport goods for the sugar cane industry. Along the trail you will find the oldest and tallest trees on the island. About 2/3 of the way down, there will be a spur trail that will take you to the natural reflecting pool where Taino Indians had carved Petroglyphs into the rock bed. Certain times of year this area also has a natural 40’ waterfall. Along the way you'll see several old plantation ruins including Par Force and the Reef Bay Sugar Plantation. There is a port-a-potty near the sugar mill ruins and the beach. The beach is very pretty and secluded but shallow so not good for swimming. Keep a look out for hermit crabs, deer, and mongoose along the way.
Reef Bay Trail
Love this hike! Wear tennis shoes and bring water! If you are at all interested in learning about the history of St. John as well as the flora and fauna, I recommend signing up for the Reef Bay Hike through the National Park. Not only will the Park Service shuttle you to the trailhead, they will lead you on a very informative 2.5 mile hike that is downhill. Then you will be shuttled back via boat. We took our 5 kids on this hike when the youngest was 6. She had no issues and was awarded the Junior Ranger badge at the end. Go to the National Park website to sign-up https://www.nps.gov/viis/planyourvisit/rangerguidedtours.htm. There is a fee and reservations strongly encouraged as this is a popular guided tour. If you choose not to go through the park service, it is a 2.5 mile down and 2.5 back UP hike (5 miles total), 1,184 foot elevation climb. The Reef Bay Trail begins at Centerline Road 4.9 miles east of Cruz Bay. Parking for four or five vehicles is available opposite the trail entrance. The trail was once a donkey path that was used to transport goods for the sugar cane industry. Along the trail you will find the oldest and tallest trees on the island. About 2/3 of the way down, there will be a spur trail that will take you to the natural reflecting pool where Taino Indians had carved Petroglyphs into the rock bed. Certain times of year this area also has a natural 40’ waterfall. Along the way you'll see several old plantation ruins including Par Force and the Reef Bay Sugar Plantation. There is a port-a-potty near the sugar mill ruins and the beach. The beach is very pretty and secluded but shallow so not good for swimming. Keep a look out for hermit crabs, deer, and mongoose along the way.
Another favorite! Starting at the parking area for Salt Pond Bay, hike a quarter of a mile downhill (uphill on the way back) to Salt Pond Bay which is a top destination for snorkelers. From there, it is a 2.2 miles round trip moderate hike to the immense, dry and rocky peninsula known as Ram’s Head Point that offers incredible views (you can see St Croix on a clear day), sunrises, and sunsets. There is a port-a-potty at Salt Pond Bay.
Ram Head Trail
Another favorite! Starting at the parking area for Salt Pond Bay, hike a quarter of a mile downhill (uphill on the way back) to Salt Pond Bay which is a top destination for snorkelers. From there, it is a 2.2 miles round trip moderate hike to the immense, dry and rocky peninsula known as Ram’s Head Point that offers incredible views (you can see St Croix on a clear day), sunrises, and sunsets. There is a port-a-potty at Salt Pond Bay.
Voted one of the top 10 most romantic spots on the island, Peace Hill is a short and easy hike with a spectacular view. Park at the Peace Hill Parking lot and follow the trail up to an old windmill and a spectacular view of Denis Bay, Hawksnest, Cinnamon, Great Thatch, Tortola and Jost van Dyke.
Peace Hill Trail
Voted one of the top 10 most romantic spots on the island, Peace Hill is a short and easy hike with a spectacular view. Park at the Peace Hill Parking lot and follow the trail up to an old windmill and a spectacular view of Denis Bay, Hawksnest, Cinnamon, Great Thatch, Tortola and Jost van Dyke.
Sightseeing
The Annaberg plantation is a partially restored sugar factory and windmill located just east of Mary's Point. National Park signage guides visitors through the ruins and explains the process of turning sugar cane into molasses. Volunteers and park rangers are frequently in the area to answer questions. The bake house hosts cooking demonstrations and offers samples of dumb bread. If their gardener is on duty, you can get a tour of the garden and learn about the local plants medicinal qualities. The windmill is located on Annaberg Point, which offers views of Tortola, Great Thatch Island, and the Narrows.
8
Einheimische empfehlen
Annaberg Sugar Plantation
8
Einheimische empfehlen
The Annaberg plantation is a partially restored sugar factory and windmill located just east of Mary's Point. National Park signage guides visitors through the ruins and explains the process of turning sugar cane into molasses. Volunteers and park rangers are frequently in the area to answer questions. The bake house hosts cooking demonstrations and offers samples of dumb bread. If their gardener is on duty, you can get a tour of the garden and learn about the local plants medicinal qualities. The windmill is located on Annaberg Point, which offers views of Tortola, Great Thatch Island, and the Narrows.
The Reef Bay Trail petroglyphs are Taíno rock carvings located on rock pools near a waterfall. They can be reached via a quarter mile-long spur trail from Reef Bay Trail. The petroglyph site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Some of the carvings are located above a reflection pool of water and were thought to be the symbols for "water". There is no exact way to confirm they are authentic Taino carvings but the most popular theory is that they are from pre-Columbian inhabitants.
Petroglyphs
The Reef Bay Trail petroglyphs are Taíno rock carvings located on rock pools near a waterfall. They can be reached via a quarter mile-long spur trail from Reef Bay Trail. The petroglyph site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Some of the carvings are located above a reflection pool of water and were thought to be the symbols for "water". There is no exact way to confirm they are authentic Taino carvings but the most popular theory is that they are from pre-Columbian inhabitants.