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ταξιδιωτικός οδηγός chania city

Kyriakos

ταξιδιωτικός οδηγός chania city

Αξιοθέατα
The lighthouse at the old harbor of Chania is the most recognizable part of the city, posing at all travel books of Crete. The story of the lighthouse starts a long ago, although its present form dates back since the Egyptian Occupation of Crete (in the early 19th century). The Venetians, under the threat of the Turks, in the late 16th century, started fortifying all towns throughout Crete. In the period 1595-1601 they made great interventions at the port of Chania. At the center of the breakwater, they built the bastion of St. Nicholas, which together with the fortress of Firkas, could protect the harbor entrance. At that time they also built the lighthouse. The current lighthouse tower is mounted on a trapezoidal base which holds since the Venetian Era. During the Turkish Occupation, the harbour of Chania and the lighthouse were neglected and abandoned. In 1839, the Egyptians restored the lighthouse as we see today. Today’s tower stands at 21m height and is visible within 7 miles.
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Lighthouse
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The lighthouse at the old harbor of Chania is the most recognizable part of the city, posing at all travel books of Crete. The story of the lighthouse starts a long ago, although its present form dates back since the Egyptian Occupation of Crete (in the early 19th century). The Venetians, under the threat of the Turks, in the late 16th century, started fortifying all towns throughout Crete. In the period 1595-1601 they made great interventions at the port of Chania. At the center of the breakwater, they built the bastion of St. Nicholas, which together with the fortress of Firkas, could protect the harbor entrance. At that time they also built the lighthouse. The current lighthouse tower is mounted on a trapezoidal base which holds since the Venetian Era. During the Turkish Occupation, the harbour of Chania and the lighthouse were neglected and abandoned. In 1839, the Egyptians restored the lighthouse as we see today. Today’s tower stands at 21m height and is visible within 7 miles.
The church of Saint George (Agios Georgios) Koubelis is located in the position Sodi east of Chania city and on the western base of Akrotiri peninsula, very close to the wastewater treatment plant. It was the temple of a small seaside monastery, from which no other buildings survive. There are no surviving references for the founding of the monastery. It is most likely that the monastery was destroyed by the raids of the Ottomans during the 17th century and has since been permanently abandoned. Today the temple belongs to the church of Prophet Elijah located at the Graves of Venizelos. The initial architectural type is hard to clarify, as are the various phases of the temple construction. The circular planes of the ruined parts of the temple are impressive, while from the original church a small section with a high dome with a cylindrical drum is preserved above the sanctuary. The name Kumbelis comes from this impressive dome (koumbes is the dome in Turkish)
Ναός Αγίου Γεωργίου Κουμπελή
The church of Saint George (Agios Georgios) Koubelis is located in the position Sodi east of Chania city and on the western base of Akrotiri peninsula, very close to the wastewater treatment plant. It was the temple of a small seaside monastery, from which no other buildings survive. There are no surviving references for the founding of the monastery. It is most likely that the monastery was destroyed by the raids of the Ottomans during the 17th century and has since been permanently abandoned. Today the temple belongs to the church of Prophet Elijah located at the Graves of Venizelos. The initial architectural type is hard to clarify, as are the various phases of the temple construction. The circular planes of the ruined parts of the temple are impressive, while from the original church a small section with a high dome with a cylindrical drum is preserved above the sanctuary. The name Kumbelis comes from this impressive dome (koumbes is the dome in Turkish)
The graves of Venizelos are located in a very historic location of Chania, next to the Venetian church of Prophet Elias at position Froudia with panoramic views to Chania. The temple was originally dedicated to the Prophet Elisha, while in the 16th century the nave of the Prophet Elijah was added. The history of space is really dramatic and is surely worth knowing. During the last Cretan revolution of 1897 against the Turks, the Revolutionary Camp of Cretans camped at this place. In morning of February 9, 1897 fights between the Turks and the Cretans started and the latter hoisted the Greek flag at Froudia. Eleftherios Venizelos, later Prime Minister of Greece, in the meanwhile tried to negotiate with the heads of the Great Powers (Russia, Italy, Britain), who did not want the autonomy of Crete. At noon of the same day, the Italian and the Russian fleet bombarded Froudia, where the Greek flag waived. The bullets hit the flagpole and it fell to the ground. Then, the Cretan hero Spyros Kayaledakis or Kayalès, within a rain of bullets, grabbed the flag and raised it, making his body a flagpole. After a while the machine guns silenced. This symbolic event is represented on the statue of Kayalès that we see at the place of the Tombs. During the bombardment of the hill by the Great Powers, the temple of Prophet Elijah was destroyed. It was later restored by the Russians, who felt that the explosion of a cannon on the Russian flagship, was the punishment of the Prophet Elias for the destruction of the temple. At the area next to the temple the ethnarch Eleftherios Venizelos and his son Sophocles Venizelos , who also became a Prime Minister of Greece, were burried. On the tomb of Venizelos we read the funeral speech, written by himself, in 1932. This reads as following: Dear friends, the dead here was a true man with courage and confidence, for him and the people that he was called to govern. Perhaps he made mistekes, but he never missed the courage, he was never a fatalist and never waited the fate so as to see his country in good condition, but he served this country with every possible mean, dedicated soul and body.
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Venizelos Graves
4 Agorastaki
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The graves of Venizelos are located in a very historic location of Chania, next to the Venetian church of Prophet Elias at position Froudia with panoramic views to Chania. The temple was originally dedicated to the Prophet Elisha, while in the 16th century the nave of the Prophet Elijah was added. The history of space is really dramatic and is surely worth knowing. During the last Cretan revolution of 1897 against the Turks, the Revolutionary Camp of Cretans camped at this place. In morning of February 9, 1897 fights between the Turks and the Cretans started and the latter hoisted the Greek flag at Froudia. Eleftherios Venizelos, later Prime Minister of Greece, in the meanwhile tried to negotiate with the heads of the Great Powers (Russia, Italy, Britain), who did not want the autonomy of Crete. At noon of the same day, the Italian and the Russian fleet bombarded Froudia, where the Greek flag waived. The bullets hit the flagpole and it fell to the ground. Then, the Cretan hero Spyros Kayaledakis or Kayalès, within a rain of bullets, grabbed the flag and raised it, making his body a flagpole. After a while the machine guns silenced. This symbolic event is represented on the statue of Kayalès that we see at the place of the Tombs. During the bombardment of the hill by the Great Powers, the temple of Prophet Elijah was destroyed. It was later restored by the Russians, who felt that the explosion of a cannon on the Russian flagship, was the punishment of the Prophet Elias for the destruction of the temple. At the area next to the temple the ethnarch Eleftherios Venizelos and his son Sophocles Venizelos , who also became a Prime Minister of Greece, were burried. On the tomb of Venizelos we read the funeral speech, written by himself, in 1932. This reads as following: Dear friends, the dead here was a true man with courage and confidence, for him and the people that he was called to govern. Perhaps he made mistekes, but he never missed the courage, he was never a fatalist and never waited the fate so as to see his country in good condition, but he served this country with every possible mean, dedicated soul and body.
The most important Greek politician, Eleftherios Venizelos, lived in his paternal house, in Chalepa (Chania), for more than thirty years, from 1880 to 1910, and occasionally, from 1927 to 1935. He was particularly attached to this house. It is the house where he spent his youth, he got married and had his two children, and where his wife died. He was staying in this house when the Revolution of 1897 broke out and when he left for Therisso, in 1905; he returned to this house before moving to Thessaloniki in order to participate in the movement of National Defense, in 1916, and he left from the same house after the movement's failure, in 1935. He lived there for almost half of his life and this house established his strong bonds with his homeland and his family. In 1876, Eleftherios Venizelos' father, Kiriakos, bought the building plot in the centre of Chalepa, a historical suburb of Chania. During the Cretan State, the residence of Crete's High Commissioner, Prince George, and the Embassies of the Great Powers as well as the residences of the bourgeois were located in Chalepa. The construction of the residence started in 1877 and was completed in 1880, when Kiriakos Venizelos moved in with his family and stayed there until 1883, year of his death. When Eleftherios Venizelos was designated Prime Minister and left for Athens, in 1910, the house was rented to relatives, foreign diplomats and Cretan politicians. The residence in Chalepa took its present form in 1927, when Eleftherios Venizelos returned to Chania and undertook its renovation. The renovation study was assigned to the architect Stavridis, and Venizelos personally supervised the works. During the next years, until the beginning of the Second World War, the sons of Eleftherios Venizelos lived in the residence. In 1941, during the Battle of Crete, the house was bombarded. The Germans restored it and used it as their headquarters and as a residence of the German Governors of the Cretan Fortress. During the occupation the house was seriously damaged and vandalised. One room of the ground floor, used by the Germans as an entertainment room, has murals of funny figures. After the liberation, Sophocles Venizelos undertook the first restoration mainly of the building's exterior, and after his death, MarikaVenizelou, the wife of Eleftherios Venizelos' son, Kiriakos, supervised the repairs of the interior of the residence. Nikitas Venizelos, grandson of Eleftherios, inherited the residence of Halepa. In 2002, the Greek State bought the residence and ceded it to the National Research Foundation “Eleftherios K. Venizelos”. After the scientific and administrative services of the Foundation were transferred to the former Vloom Mansion, in 2005, the Venizelos residence remained the Foundation's headquarters and it has been converted into a Museum, a commemoration site for Eleftherios Venizelos. The residence bears the imprint of Eleftherios Venizelos and the building has maintained its original form, of the years he lived there. The furniture of the decade 1925-1935 was selected by Venizelos himself and his wife Elena, and was brought from Athens and abroad. Decorative objects and paintings of the period, original photographs and personal items of significant value decorate the interior of the residence.
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Eleftherios Venizelos' House
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The most important Greek politician, Eleftherios Venizelos, lived in his paternal house, in Chalepa (Chania), for more than thirty years, from 1880 to 1910, and occasionally, from 1927 to 1935. He was particularly attached to this house. It is the house where he spent his youth, he got married and had his two children, and where his wife died. He was staying in this house when the Revolution of 1897 broke out and when he left for Therisso, in 1905; he returned to this house before moving to Thessaloniki in order to participate in the movement of National Defense, in 1916, and he left from the same house after the movement's failure, in 1935. He lived there for almost half of his life and this house established his strong bonds with his homeland and his family. In 1876, Eleftherios Venizelos' father, Kiriakos, bought the building plot in the centre of Chalepa, a historical suburb of Chania. During the Cretan State, the residence of Crete's High Commissioner, Prince George, and the Embassies of the Great Powers as well as the residences of the bourgeois were located in Chalepa. The construction of the residence started in 1877 and was completed in 1880, when Kiriakos Venizelos moved in with his family and stayed there until 1883, year of his death. When Eleftherios Venizelos was designated Prime Minister and left for Athens, in 1910, the house was rented to relatives, foreign diplomats and Cretan politicians. The residence in Chalepa took its present form in 1927, when Eleftherios Venizelos returned to Chania and undertook its renovation. The renovation study was assigned to the architect Stavridis, and Venizelos personally supervised the works. During the next years, until the beginning of the Second World War, the sons of Eleftherios Venizelos lived in the residence. In 1941, during the Battle of Crete, the house was bombarded. The Germans restored it and used it as their headquarters and as a residence of the German Governors of the Cretan Fortress. During the occupation the house was seriously damaged and vandalised. One room of the ground floor, used by the Germans as an entertainment room, has murals of funny figures. After the liberation, Sophocles Venizelos undertook the first restoration mainly of the building's exterior, and after his death, MarikaVenizelou, the wife of Eleftherios Venizelos' son, Kiriakos, supervised the repairs of the interior of the residence. Nikitas Venizelos, grandson of Eleftherios, inherited the residence of Halepa. In 2002, the Greek State bought the residence and ceded it to the National Research Foundation “Eleftherios K. Venizelos”. After the scientific and administrative services of the Foundation were transferred to the former Vloom Mansion, in 2005, the Venizelos residence remained the Foundation's headquarters and it has been converted into a Museum, a commemoration site for Eleftherios Venizelos. The residence bears the imprint of Eleftherios Venizelos and the building has maintained its original form, of the years he lived there. The furniture of the decade 1925-1935 was selected by Venizelos himself and his wife Elena, and was brought from Athens and abroad. Decorative objects and paintings of the period, original photographs and personal items of significant value decorate the interior of the residence.
In the center of Splantzia Square (square 1821) in Chania stands out the huge plane tree that is connected to the dramatic moments of the Cretan people for liberation. On the plane tree during the Ottoman domination, Greek Christians, who fought for the Cretan freedom, were hanged, executed and tortured. The square hosts a memorial plate in their memory. One of the most well-known dramas took place in the early days of the Great Revolution in mainland Greece (1821), when the Ottomans, worried about the prospect of moving the revolution to the island, hanged the bishop of Kissamos Melchizedek Despotakis on May 19, 1821, after having been hung and then dragged by the Ottoman mob into the narrow streets of the town. The same thing happened to the priest from Veria, Kallinikos. Underneath the plane-tree there was an octagonal Arabian gazebo, in which the state's prominent beys were allowed to sit and enjoy their coffee. At the northwestern edge of the square Splantzia we meet the church of San Rocco. The construction of the temple took place in 1630, probably after the outbreak of a plague, as Saint Rokkos was the protector against plague. Under the cornice there is the inscription: DEO O(PTIMO).M.(AXIMO) ET D(IVO). ROCCO DICATVM. M.D.CXXX. DEDICATED TO EXCELLENT AND MAXIMUM GOD AND ST ROCCO 1630 During the Ottoman Era it functioned as a military outpost, while during the Cretan State and until 1925 as a police station.
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1821 Plateau - Splantzia
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In the center of Splantzia Square (square 1821) in Chania stands out the huge plane tree that is connected to the dramatic moments of the Cretan people for liberation. On the plane tree during the Ottoman domination, Greek Christians, who fought for the Cretan freedom, were hanged, executed and tortured. The square hosts a memorial plate in their memory. One of the most well-known dramas took place in the early days of the Great Revolution in mainland Greece (1821), when the Ottomans, worried about the prospect of moving the revolution to the island, hanged the bishop of Kissamos Melchizedek Despotakis on May 19, 1821, after having been hung and then dragged by the Ottoman mob into the narrow streets of the town. The same thing happened to the priest from Veria, Kallinikos. Underneath the plane-tree there was an octagonal Arabian gazebo, in which the state's prominent beys were allowed to sit and enjoy their coffee. At the northwestern edge of the square Splantzia we meet the church of San Rocco. The construction of the temple took place in 1630, probably after the outbreak of a plague, as Saint Rokkos was the protector against plague. Under the cornice there is the inscription: DEO O(PTIMO).M.(AXIMO) ET D(IVO). ROCCO DICATVM. M.D.CXXX. DEDICATED TO EXCELLENT AND MAXIMUM GOD AND ST ROCCO 1630 During the Ottoman Era it functioned as a military outpost, while during the Cretan State and until 1925 as a police station.
The present Cathedral temple of "Eisodion" was built on the place of an older temple of "Theotokos" (Virgin Mary) Trimartiri, dating back to the 14th century. When the city of Chania was occupied by the Turks in 1645, the temple was converted into a soap-factory without altering its initial design. Until 1868, the temple functioned as a soap-factory and belonged to the Turkish dignitary Moustafa Pasha Giritli (= the Cretan). In the area of the olive storage room, Moustafa had ordered the protection of the icon of Virgin Mary with a vigil candle. According to tradition, the soap-factory business failed and was abandoned, and the icon of Virgin Mary was taken by the last technician. When Moustafa became Prime Minister, during the reign of the Sultan Metzit, the Christian Community requested the re-construction of the temple in the place of the soap-factory. Moustafa assigned the area for this purpose and the Sultan and Veli Pasha (the Commander of Crete) provided monetary support. Despite the hostility between the Christians and the Ottomans, this contribution was appreciated and the church was finally re-built. The construction of the church was completed in 1860 in the style of a three aisle Basilica. The middle aisle is higher and covered by a pointed arch. The other aisles are covered by cross-ribbed vaults and are divided vertically by the women's balcony. On the northeast side of the temple there is the high bell-tower. The architectural elements of the temple are associated more with the tradition developed in the period of the Venetian occupation: sculptured pseudo-pillars, cornices and arched openings. The east wall is decorated with large and impressive religious paintings, the works of G. Kalliterakis, G. Stravrakis, E. Tripolitakis and D. Kokotsis. The icon of the Virgin Mary ("Eisodion tis Theotokou") was also returned to the temple. The temple is closely connected to the historical events in the city and it was an asylum and shelter during war time and revolutions. It was severely damaged in May 1941 by the bombs dropped by the Germans.
Trimartiri, Chania's Cathedral Church
20 Mpetolo
The present Cathedral temple of "Eisodion" was built on the place of an older temple of "Theotokos" (Virgin Mary) Trimartiri, dating back to the 14th century. When the city of Chania was occupied by the Turks in 1645, the temple was converted into a soap-factory without altering its initial design. Until 1868, the temple functioned as a soap-factory and belonged to the Turkish dignitary Moustafa Pasha Giritli (= the Cretan). In the area of the olive storage room, Moustafa had ordered the protection of the icon of Virgin Mary with a vigil candle. According to tradition, the soap-factory business failed and was abandoned, and the icon of Virgin Mary was taken by the last technician. When Moustafa became Prime Minister, during the reign of the Sultan Metzit, the Christian Community requested the re-construction of the temple in the place of the soap-factory. Moustafa assigned the area for this purpose and the Sultan and Veli Pasha (the Commander of Crete) provided monetary support. Despite the hostility between the Christians and the Ottomans, this contribution was appreciated and the church was finally re-built. The construction of the church was completed in 1860 in the style of a three aisle Basilica. The middle aisle is higher and covered by a pointed arch. The other aisles are covered by cross-ribbed vaults and are divided vertically by the women's balcony. On the northeast side of the temple there is the high bell-tower. The architectural elements of the temple are associated more with the tradition developed in the period of the Venetian occupation: sculptured pseudo-pillars, cornices and arched openings. The east wall is decorated with large and impressive religious paintings, the works of G. Kalliterakis, G. Stravrakis, E. Tripolitakis and D. Kokotsis. The icon of the Virgin Mary ("Eisodion tis Theotokou") was also returned to the temple. The temple is closely connected to the historical events in the city and it was an asylum and shelter during war time and revolutions. It was severely damaged in May 1941 by the bombs dropped by the Germans.
The museum has been housed since 1997 in the church of the monastery of San Salvatore, dating probably from the 15th century, next to the bastions on the west side of the Venetian fortifications of Chania. At the south side we still meet a covered portico (chiostro) that housed the cells of the Franciscan monks. During the Ottoman Era the church was converted into a mosque, the mosque of Aga Khan. The exhibits come from archaeological findings of the excavation activities of 13th Ephorate of Byzantine Antiquities, from private collections and donations. These findings outline the historical and artistic figure of the prefecture of Chania during the Byzantine and post-Byzantine times. The strictly selected objects, due to room shortage, are representative examples of the long historical course of Chania prefecture. The exhibits of each section are presented in chronological succession, while maps and information tables inform the guests about the origin of the exhibit and the historical context of each era. Some of the exhibits are the mosaic floor of a basilica of the 6th century, frescoes and icons with an excellent sample of the icon of St. George on horseback painted by Emmanuel Jane (1660-1680 ), the dedicatory inscription of 1623 with Venetian coats of arm, deformed masks, wall parts and other important findings.
Byzantine and Postbyzantine Collection of Chania
82 Theotokopoulou
The museum has been housed since 1997 in the church of the monastery of San Salvatore, dating probably from the 15th century, next to the bastions on the west side of the Venetian fortifications of Chania. At the south side we still meet a covered portico (chiostro) that housed the cells of the Franciscan monks. During the Ottoman Era the church was converted into a mosque, the mosque of Aga Khan. The exhibits come from archaeological findings of the excavation activities of 13th Ephorate of Byzantine Antiquities, from private collections and donations. These findings outline the historical and artistic figure of the prefecture of Chania during the Byzantine and post-Byzantine times. The strictly selected objects, due to room shortage, are representative examples of the long historical course of Chania prefecture. The exhibits of each section are presented in chronological succession, while maps and information tables inform the guests about the origin of the exhibit and the historical context of each era. Some of the exhibits are the mosaic floor of a basilica of the 6th century, frescoes and icons with an excellent sample of the icon of St. George on horseback painted by Emmanuel Jane (1660-1680 ), the dedicatory inscription of 1623 with Venetian coats of arm, deformed masks, wall parts and other important findings.
On the west side of Chania harbor, the traveler can still visit Firkas fortress, still dominating a low hill and housing the modern Naval Museum of Crete. Firkas is a Turkish name and means division, as the fort housed the headquarters of the Turkish Division. Firkas is one of the most impressive Venetian fortresses. It was the main fortress of the Venetian town, built in a key position and protecting the harbor entrance. Outside the main gate, a strong iron ring (called kerkelos) was placed to which one end of the chain closing off the harbor mouth was attached. The other end was attached to the lighthouse. The fortress still has several underground tunnels, which were used for imprisoning the rebelling locals. At the fort of Firkas, the most glorious page of the modern Crete was written on 1 December 1913, when the Prime Minister of Greece, Eleftherios Venizelos, and the King if Greece, Constantine, raised the Greek flag after 800 years of slavery, sealing the Union of the autonomous Cretan State with Greece. Another event associated with Firkas was the removal of the Greek flag on 18 August 1908. The flag was raised by the Cretan deputies that declared unilateral union with Greece, taking advantage of domestic turmoil in Turkey, but this act was not recognized by the Great Powers. Thus the flag was removed by the “protectors” of the Cretan State, the Great Powers. Thus, Firkas became a holy symbol for the Cretans, the symbol of struggling for the liberation of the island.
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Firka Fortress
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On the west side of Chania harbor, the traveler can still visit Firkas fortress, still dominating a low hill and housing the modern Naval Museum of Crete. Firkas is a Turkish name and means division, as the fort housed the headquarters of the Turkish Division. Firkas is one of the most impressive Venetian fortresses. It was the main fortress of the Venetian town, built in a key position and protecting the harbor entrance. Outside the main gate, a strong iron ring (called kerkelos) was placed to which one end of the chain closing off the harbor mouth was attached. The other end was attached to the lighthouse. The fortress still has several underground tunnels, which were used for imprisoning the rebelling locals. At the fort of Firkas, the most glorious page of the modern Crete was written on 1 December 1913, when the Prime Minister of Greece, Eleftherios Venizelos, and the King if Greece, Constantine, raised the Greek flag after 800 years of slavery, sealing the Union of the autonomous Cretan State with Greece. Another event associated with Firkas was the removal of the Greek flag on 18 August 1908. The flag was raised by the Cretan deputies that declared unilateral union with Greece, taking advantage of domestic turmoil in Turkey, but this act was not recognized by the Great Powers. Thus the flag was removed by the “protectors” of the Cretan State, the Great Powers. Thus, Firkas became a holy symbol for the Cretans, the symbol of struggling for the liberation of the island.
21 Halidon Street, Chania Venetian Harbour At the entrance of the port of Chania is situated the Venetian Fortress Firkas, where on December 1st 1913, the Greek flag has been hoisted, sealing the union of Crete with the motherland Greece. The Maritime Museum of Crete was founded in 1973 in order to accommodate and present Greek naval traditions, and especially those of Crete, which they constitute a part of the national glory. The Museum is the second maritime one in antiquity in Greece, after the Maritime Museum of Greece in Piraeus. The exhibition is divided into 13 sections and covers two floors. Downstairs documents are exposed by the Union of Crete with Greece in 1913, while the first floor is dedicated to the Second World War to the present day and to the Battle of Crete. The permanent exhibition includes 2,500 exhibits such as relics, objects found in sea, paintings, maps, photographs, ship models, various nautical instruments etc. Among the important exhibits of the museum is the room with the shells of all sizes and colors, the model of an Athenian trireme, the representation of the board of the ship of "Syros" that was designed by pictorial depictions on vases of that era, dioramas of the Persian Wars and the Peloponnesian War, models of ships that took part against the Turks, a model of the first submarine named "Dolphin" and more. Do not forget to see the docks of the Venetian harbor, the representation of the Minoan ship "Minoa" of 16th-15th century BC that was launched in December 2003 and in 2004 made its maiden trip from Chania to Piraeus, accompanying the Olympic flame that was moved by the Athenian Trireme in the last part of the route, and boating events and celebrations of Naval Week.
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Maritime Museum of Crete
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21 Halidon Street, Chania Venetian Harbour At the entrance of the port of Chania is situated the Venetian Fortress Firkas, where on December 1st 1913, the Greek flag has been hoisted, sealing the union of Crete with the motherland Greece. The Maritime Museum of Crete was founded in 1973 in order to accommodate and present Greek naval traditions, and especially those of Crete, which they constitute a part of the national glory. The Museum is the second maritime one in antiquity in Greece, after the Maritime Museum of Greece in Piraeus. The exhibition is divided into 13 sections and covers two floors. Downstairs documents are exposed by the Union of Crete with Greece in 1913, while the first floor is dedicated to the Second World War to the present day and to the Battle of Crete. The permanent exhibition includes 2,500 exhibits such as relics, objects found in sea, paintings, maps, photographs, ship models, various nautical instruments etc. Among the important exhibits of the museum is the room with the shells of all sizes and colors, the model of an Athenian trireme, the representation of the board of the ship of "Syros" that was designed by pictorial depictions on vases of that era, dioramas of the Persian Wars and the Peloponnesian War, models of ships that took part against the Turks, a model of the first submarine named "Dolphin" and more. Do not forget to see the docks of the Venetian harbor, the representation of the Minoan ship "Minoa" of 16th-15th century BC that was launched in December 2003 and in 2004 made its maiden trip from Chania to Piraeus, accompanying the Olympic flame that was moved by the Athenian Trireme in the last part of the route, and boating events and celebrations of Naval Week.
The Küçük Hasan Pasha Mosque or Gialisi Tzami (mosque of the sea) is actually the only preserved mosque of the city of Chania. It was built on the site of a preexisting Christian temple after the conquest of Chania by the Ottomans in 1645, honoring Küçük Hasan Pasha. The mosque bears a large semispherical dome supported by stone arches. The north and west sides house a gallery that is topped by six small domes. This gallery was initially open, as used in the mosques, but in the late 19th century it was closed by arched openings. The mosque was a project of the same Armenian architect that built the mosque of Spaniakos, near Paleochora. The mosque was surrounded by a nice yard with tall palm trees, which hosted the graves of the Ottoman rulers. It ceased its opetation in 1923 and its minaret was demolished in 1939. During the 2nd World War it housed the Archaeological Museum of Chania. Afterwards it was used as a storehouse, folklore museum, tourist information point and exhibition venue.
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Mosque Küçük Hasan مسجد
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The Küçük Hasan Pasha Mosque or Gialisi Tzami (mosque of the sea) is actually the only preserved mosque of the city of Chania. It was built on the site of a preexisting Christian temple after the conquest of Chania by the Ottomans in 1645, honoring Küçük Hasan Pasha. The mosque bears a large semispherical dome supported by stone arches. The north and west sides house a gallery that is topped by six small domes. This gallery was initially open, as used in the mosques, but in the late 19th century it was closed by arched openings. The mosque was a project of the same Armenian architect that built the mosque of Spaniakos, near Paleochora. The mosque was surrounded by a nice yard with tall palm trees, which hosted the graves of the Ottoman rulers. It ceased its opetation in 1923 and its minaret was demolished in 1939. During the 2nd World War it housed the Archaeological Museum of Chania. Afterwards it was used as a storehouse, folklore museum, tourist information point and exhibition venue.
It is hosted in the Great Shipyard (Arsenali) of Chania, the last of the 17 shipyards located in the Venetian port of Chania. The construction of the building started in 1585 by Alvise Grimani. During the Ottoman Era, in 1872, a floor was added and a new era arrived for the Great Arsenali. The building hosted several important Public Services, such as the school of the Christian Community. In 1892 it housed and theatrical performances in the great Hall. It was also used as a public hospital, since 1923, and as City Hall from 1828 to 1941. In 1997, after a movement of the locals and under the context of the National Cultural Network of Cities, the Ministry of Culture signed the founding of the Center of Mediterranean Architecture. The Centre's aim is to encourage both professionals and non-professionals to participate in shaping the built and natural environment, determine the function and the aesthetics of the city and the quality of life of its inhabitants. Therefore scientific seminars, conferences, lectures and international exhibitions are organized here. It has collaborated with several Organizations such as the University of Crete, the Departments of Architecture (of Athens Technical University, Thessaloniki University, University of Thessaly, Patras , Democritus University of Xanthi and Technical University Crete), the School of Fine Arts, the European Association for Architectural Education , the Macedonian Museum of Contemporary Art in Thessaloniki, the Goethe Institute and the French Institute, the Embassies of France, Switzerland, Japan, Norway, the Greek Architecture Institute, the Institute of Modern Greek Culture in Berlin, etc.
KAM Center of Mediterranean Architecture
31 Katechaki ke Akti Tompazi
It is hosted in the Great Shipyard (Arsenali) of Chania, the last of the 17 shipyards located in the Venetian port of Chania. The construction of the building started in 1585 by Alvise Grimani. During the Ottoman Era, in 1872, a floor was added and a new era arrived for the Great Arsenali. The building hosted several important Public Services, such as the school of the Christian Community. In 1892 it housed and theatrical performances in the great Hall. It was also used as a public hospital, since 1923, and as City Hall from 1828 to 1941. In 1997, after a movement of the locals and under the context of the National Cultural Network of Cities, the Ministry of Culture signed the founding of the Center of Mediterranean Architecture. The Centre's aim is to encourage both professionals and non-professionals to participate in shaping the built and natural environment, determine the function and the aesthetics of the city and the quality of life of its inhabitants. Therefore scientific seminars, conferences, lectures and international exhibitions are organized here. It has collaborated with several Organizations such as the University of Crete, the Departments of Architecture (of Athens Technical University, Thessaloniki University, University of Thessaly, Patras , Democritus University of Xanthi and Technical University Crete), the School of Fine Arts, the European Association for Architectural Education , the Macedonian Museum of Contemporary Art in Thessaloniki, the Goethe Institute and the French Institute, the Embassies of France, Switzerland, Japan, Norway, the Greek Architecture Institute, the Institute of Modern Greek Culture in Berlin, etc.
98 Chalidon Street, Chania The Municipal Art Gallery of Chania is housed in a typical commercial industrial building of neoclassical Greek architecture in the late 19th and early 20th century in Halidon street, on the way to the Venetian harbor of Chania and near the Archaeological Museum. It started its operation began in early 2003 and houses a remarkable collection of about 700 works, either paintings or carvings of famous Greek artists such as Dimitris Mytaras, Spyros Vassiliou, Vaso Katraki, Dimitris Galanis, Spyros Vikatos, Andreas Georgiadis and several Cretan artists. Apart from the permanent collection, temporary exhibitions are organized frequently by the club Painting without Bounds. Πηγή: Chania Art Gallery - Travel Guide for Island Crete, Greece cretanbeaches.com
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Einheimische empfehlen
Municipal Art Gallery
100 Chalidon
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Einheimische empfehlen
98 Chalidon Street, Chania The Municipal Art Gallery of Chania is housed in a typical commercial industrial building of neoclassical Greek architecture in the late 19th and early 20th century in Halidon street, on the way to the Venetian harbor of Chania and near the Archaeological Museum. It started its operation began in early 2003 and houses a remarkable collection of about 700 works, either paintings or carvings of famous Greek artists such as Dimitris Mytaras, Spyros Vassiliou, Vaso Katraki, Dimitris Galanis, Spyros Vikatos, Andreas Georgiadis and several Cretan artists. Apart from the permanent collection, temporary exhibitions are organized frequently by the club Painting without Bounds. Πηγή: Chania Art Gallery - Travel Guide for Island Crete, Greece cretanbeaches.com
Halidon Street 30, Chania The Archaeological Museum of Chania is located next to the Venetian harbor and is housed in the church of the old Venetian monastery of Agios Fragiskos (St Francis) of the Franciscans. The exhibition is divided into two major sections. The eastern section hosts findings from the Neolithic until the Late Minoan period and the western part hosts objects from the Geometric period until Roman times. At each showcase objects are classified either according their location or object category. The collections include Minoan findings from the city and the prefecture of Chania, prehistoric findings from caves, tombs of the Geometric Era, historical findings from the city of Chania and from various other towns, coins, jewelry (prehistoric and historic Times), sculptures, inscriptions, columns, mosaics. The Museum also hosts the collection of Mitsotakis family donated to the Archaeological Museum of Chania in 2000 and occupies three small rooms. HISTORY OF THE BUILDING The monastery survives altered mainly during the Ottoman domination, but also in modern times. At the south side there was the double gallery with the monk cells and other buildings. Today the gallery is largely integrated into the houses and shops next to the entrance of modern Catholic Church. The north part of the church is marked on maps with a nice garden, similar to the current garden that operates since the operation of the temple as a mosque. On the eastern side of the monument still stands the base of the high bell tower. During the Ottoman Era, the temple was converted into a mosque, the mosque of Yusuf Pasha. Then, the Turks added at the northwest side the minaret (today ruined) and an octagonal fountain in the courtyard. It was later used as a cinema, called Ideon Andron, and after the Second World War it was a military storehouse. The building was restored in the late 1970s Πηγή: Archaeological Museum of Chania (St Francis) - Travel Guide for Island Crete, Greece cretanbeaches.com
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Archäologisches Museum Chania
28 Chalidon
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Einheimische empfehlen
Halidon Street 30, Chania The Archaeological Museum of Chania is located next to the Venetian harbor and is housed in the church of the old Venetian monastery of Agios Fragiskos (St Francis) of the Franciscans. The exhibition is divided into two major sections. The eastern section hosts findings from the Neolithic until the Late Minoan period and the western part hosts objects from the Geometric period until Roman times. At each showcase objects are classified either according their location or object category. The collections include Minoan findings from the city and the prefecture of Chania, prehistoric findings from caves, tombs of the Geometric Era, historical findings from the city of Chania and from various other towns, coins, jewelry (prehistoric and historic Times), sculptures, inscriptions, columns, mosaics. The Museum also hosts the collection of Mitsotakis family donated to the Archaeological Museum of Chania in 2000 and occupies three small rooms. HISTORY OF THE BUILDING The monastery survives altered mainly during the Ottoman domination, but also in modern times. At the south side there was the double gallery with the monk cells and other buildings. Today the gallery is largely integrated into the houses and shops next to the entrance of modern Catholic Church. The north part of the church is marked on maps with a nice garden, similar to the current garden that operates since the operation of the temple as a mosque. On the eastern side of the monument still stands the base of the high bell tower. During the Ottoman Era, the temple was converted into a mosque, the mosque of Yusuf Pasha. Then, the Turks added at the northwest side the minaret (today ruined) and an octagonal fountain in the courtyard. It was later used as a cinema, called Ideon Andron, and after the Second World War it was a military storehouse. The building was restored in the late 1970s Πηγή: Archaeological Museum of Chania (St Francis) - Travel Guide for Island Crete, Greece cretanbeaches.com