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La guida di Annamaria E Anna

Annamaria E Anna
Annamaria E Anna
Bei Airbnb seit 2019
Annamaria E Anna

La guida di Annamaria E Anna

Offerta gastronomica
Perched on the Murgia dei Trulli, Cisternino is one of Italy’s Most Beautiful Towns. Here you can wander around narrow streets paved with “chianche” (typical limestone paving stones) and feast on grilled meat at a “fornello pronto” (a butchers' shop with a dining area where the meat is cooked). You can also explore the historic centre on foot! Follow the street that leads from Porta Grande past the spacious Piazza Vittorio Emanuele and its lovely Clock Tower to Porta Piccola Cisternino's small streets are filled with the inviting fragrance of meat that has been grilled the traditional way in typical wood-burning ovens. In fact, Cisternino is famous for its “fornelli pronti,” butchers' shops equipped with an oven and small rooms where you can sip on a glass of good wine as you tuck into grilled “gnummareddi” (livers) or delicious bombette, balls of rolled-up veal slices, either plain or stuffed with caciocavallo cheese, that are cooked on a skewer.
CISTERNINO CENTRO STORICO
Perched on the Murgia dei Trulli, Cisternino is one of Italy’s Most Beautiful Towns. Here you can wander around narrow streets paved with “chianche” (typical limestone paving stones) and feast on grilled meat at a “fornello pronto” (a butchers' shop with a dining area where the meat is cooked). You can also explore the historic centre on foot! Follow the street that leads from Porta Grande past the spacious Piazza Vittorio Emanuele and its lovely Clock Tower to Porta Piccola Cisternino's small streets are filled with the inviting fragrance of meat that has been grilled the traditional way in typical wood-burning ovens. In fact, Cisternino is famous for its “fornelli pronti,” butchers' shops equipped with an oven and small rooms where you can sip on a glass of good wine as you tuck into grilled “gnummareddi” (livers) or delicious bombette, balls of rolled-up veal slices, either plain or stuffed with caciocavallo cheese, that are cooked on a skewer.
Visite turistiche
In the heart of the Murgia dei Trulli, 50 kilometres (31 miles) away from Bari, a lovely spread of pinnacles announces Alberobello's characteristic historic centre, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Alberobello's striking expanse of trulli has also received the Touring Club of Italy's Orange Flag in recognition of the excellent accommodation it offers and its harmonious architecture. Narrow, winding lanes weave past small, characteristic piazzas in the Rione Monti, home to the “Siamese trullo” and its unusual, twin-cone roofs, the Church of Sant’Antonio, and the Trullo Sovrano. Must-sees include the Museo del Territorio, housed in a series of interconnected trulli, and the Casa d’Amore, the first building in town to be built with lime and mortar and now a valuable tourist information point.
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Alberobello
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In the heart of the Murgia dei Trulli, 50 kilometres (31 miles) away from Bari, a lovely spread of pinnacles announces Alberobello's characteristic historic centre, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Alberobello's striking expanse of trulli has also received the Touring Club of Italy's Orange Flag in recognition of the excellent accommodation it offers and its harmonious architecture. Narrow, winding lanes weave past small, characteristic piazzas in the Rione Monti, home to the “Siamese trullo” and its unusual, twin-cone roofs, the Church of Sant’Antonio, and the Trullo Sovrano. Must-sees include the Museo del Territorio, housed in a series of interconnected trulli, and the Casa d’Amore, the first building in town to be built with lime and mortar and now a valuable tourist information point.
Ostuni, the White Town, is picturesque and to be experienced. Ostuni, a renowned tourist destination, boasts a wonderful medieval village, rich with alleys and whitewashed houses, in a maze of streets which recalls an Arab Kasbah. Take a stroll in the old town centre, called “la terra” (the land) to distinguish it from the more recent “marina”: it offers picturesque spots amid the alleys, sloping stairs, courtyards and small squares, where whitewashed houses appear, embellished with geraniums, craft shops, typical restaurants and small shops.
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Ostuni
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Ostuni, the White Town, is picturesque and to be experienced. Ostuni, a renowned tourist destination, boasts a wonderful medieval village, rich with alleys and whitewashed houses, in a maze of streets which recalls an Arab Kasbah. Take a stroll in the old town centre, called “la terra” (the land) to distinguish it from the more recent “marina”: it offers picturesque spots amid the alleys, sloping stairs, courtyards and small squares, where whitewashed houses appear, embellished with geraniums, craft shops, typical restaurants and small shops.
With its medieval structure, the historic center of Ceglie Messapica is an environmental-architectural gem protected since 1999. The urban design is dominated by the Ducale castle and the Collegiata church, with a thick maze of narrow alleyways and paved streets with typical "chianche" stones like in Piazza Vecchia, where whitewashed houses and their flowered balconies dot every corner. As a Slow Food presidium, the Ceglie Messapica Biscotto is an irregular cube shaped pastry made with toasted almond paste and stuffed with cherry or grape jam, then flavored with a light citrus fragrance. A sugar and cocoa icing is optional. Known as "U 'Piscquett'l", it has a long rural tradition, as it was prepared for big parties or wedding banquets or to embellish wedding gifts. Today, biscuits are sold in pastry shops and bakeries, usually enjoyed with sweet wines or combined with home-made rosolio liquor.
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Ceglie Messapica
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With its medieval structure, the historic center of Ceglie Messapica is an environmental-architectural gem protected since 1999. The urban design is dominated by the Ducale castle and the Collegiata church, with a thick maze of narrow alleyways and paved streets with typical "chianche" stones like in Piazza Vecchia, where whitewashed houses and their flowered balconies dot every corner. As a Slow Food presidium, the Ceglie Messapica Biscotto is an irregular cube shaped pastry made with toasted almond paste and stuffed with cherry or grape jam, then flavored with a light citrus fragrance. A sugar and cocoa icing is optional. Known as "U 'Piscquett'l", it has a long rural tradition, as it was prepared for big parties or wedding banquets or to embellish wedding gifts. Today, biscuits are sold in pastry shops and bakeries, usually enjoyed with sweet wines or combined with home-made rosolio liquor.
The Castellana Caves (Grotte di Castellana) are a must-see attraction in the province of Bari. Situated in the Itria valley near the town of Alberobello, this stunning complex of underground caves of Karst origin is one of the largest of its kind anywhere on the planet. This 3 km-long system of caves features a series of passageways and chambers located 70 metres underground and dominated by rows of stalactites hanging like giant needles, with glittering walls of crystal, underground lakes and huge stalagmites towering up from the rock floor. The guided tour explores a stunning underworld, where caverns, canyons, fossils, stalactites and stalagmites in astonishing colours and shapes capture the imagination of children and adults alike. The Caves are also home to characteristic fauna, bats in particular – harmless to visitors – as well as rare species of small crustaceans and a special cave-dwelling grasshopper.
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Grotte di Castellana
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The Castellana Caves (Grotte di Castellana) are a must-see attraction in the province of Bari. Situated in the Itria valley near the town of Alberobello, this stunning complex of underground caves of Karst origin is one of the largest of its kind anywhere on the planet. This 3 km-long system of caves features a series of passageways and chambers located 70 metres underground and dominated by rows of stalactites hanging like giant needles, with glittering walls of crystal, underground lakes and huge stalagmites towering up from the rock floor. The guided tour explores a stunning underworld, where caverns, canyons, fossils, stalactites and stalagmites in astonishing colours and shapes capture the imagination of children and adults alike. The Caves are also home to characteristic fauna, bats in particular – harmless to visitors – as well as rare species of small crustaceans and a special cave-dwelling grasshopper.
Known as the “Pearl of the Adriatic”, Polignano a Mare is the ideal place to plunge into uncontaminated waters and explore a picturesque historic centre by the sea. Crystal clear waters and cliffs pitted with caves carved by the sea give Polignano a Mare its uniqueness. A small town, known also as the “Pearl of the Adriatic,” it's just over 30 km (18.5 miles) from Bari. Poligano is the birthplace of the renowned singer Domenico Modugno, who became famous for his song Nel blu dipinto di blu (“In the Sky, Painted Blue”). The fascinating historical centre reveals traces of its Arab, Byzantine, Spanish and Norman past, including the remains of the four watchtowers that once guarded the ancient town.
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Polignano a Mare
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Known as the “Pearl of the Adriatic”, Polignano a Mare is the ideal place to plunge into uncontaminated waters and explore a picturesque historic centre by the sea. Crystal clear waters and cliffs pitted with caves carved by the sea give Polignano a Mare its uniqueness. A small town, known also as the “Pearl of the Adriatic,” it's just over 30 km (18.5 miles) from Bari. Poligano is the birthplace of the renowned singer Domenico Modugno, who became famous for his song Nel blu dipinto di blu (“In the Sky, Painted Blue”). The fascinating historical centre reveals traces of its Arab, Byzantine, Spanish and Norman past, including the remains of the four watchtowers that once guarded the ancient town.
Lovely beaches and an old town centre full of art and history make Monopoli one of the most beautiful towns on the Adriatic coast. The outline of a castle and ancient walls announce the beautiful town of Monopoli, which overlooks the Adriatic Sea 40 km (25 miles) from Bari. The town’s 99 contrade (districts) stretch out flatly, allowing you to admire them entirely with a single glance from the splendid belvedere of Loggia del Pilato. This natural terrace, on the road to Selva di Fasano, overlooks a countryside characterized by masserie (farmsteads), churches, rupestrian settlements, and villas. The symbol of the town is the Castello Carlo V (Castle of Charles V), which stands on the promontory of Punta Penna, and today hosts exhibitions and conferences.
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Monopoli
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Lovely beaches and an old town centre full of art and history make Monopoli one of the most beautiful towns on the Adriatic coast. The outline of a castle and ancient walls announce the beautiful town of Monopoli, which overlooks the Adriatic Sea 40 km (25 miles) from Bari. The town’s 99 contrade (districts) stretch out flatly, allowing you to admire them entirely with a single glance from the splendid belvedere of Loggia del Pilato. This natural terrace, on the road to Selva di Fasano, overlooks a countryside characterized by masserie (farmsteads), churches, rupestrian settlements, and villas. The symbol of the town is the Castello Carlo V (Castle of Charles V), which stands on the promontory of Punta Penna, and today hosts exhibitions and conferences.
Visit + food
This is a city of rose windows, stone flourishes, garlands, Solomonic columns, small piazzas, and unexpected alleyways. Start your visit by walking under the arch of Porta Napoli and heading into the historic centre along Via Palmieri, flanked by aristocratic palazzos as it leads to Piazza Duomo. Alternatively, if you start at Porta Rudiae, you can abandon the paving stones of Via Libertini and dive into the ancient and intricate labyrinth that is the multi-ethnic Giravolte district, a crucible of ethnicities and cultures today, as it was in the past. You could then continue your tour by exploring the charming alleys and small piazzas, where the local Lecce stone glows pink as the sun sets. The art of marrying simple ingredients to obtain unique flavours is common to the Salento cuisine. But there are three products that are typically paired with the adjective “leccese” (belonging to Lecce): the delicious pasticciotto, a small shortcrust pastry filled with rich custard; cotognata, a type of quince jam that solidifies and is packaged in slabs; and, moving from the sweet to the savoury, the rustic, a favourite mid-morning local snack, this is made at delicatessens from puff pastry stuffed with béchamel, mozzarella, tomatoes, and a pinch of pepper. At Christmas and Easter, a sweet almond paste is a must on every table in town.
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Lecce
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This is a city of rose windows, stone flourishes, garlands, Solomonic columns, small piazzas, and unexpected alleyways. Start your visit by walking under the arch of Porta Napoli and heading into the historic centre along Via Palmieri, flanked by aristocratic palazzos as it leads to Piazza Duomo. Alternatively, if you start at Porta Rudiae, you can abandon the paving stones of Via Libertini and dive into the ancient and intricate labyrinth that is the multi-ethnic Giravolte district, a crucible of ethnicities and cultures today, as it was in the past. You could then continue your tour by exploring the charming alleys and small piazzas, where the local Lecce stone glows pink as the sun sets. The art of marrying simple ingredients to obtain unique flavours is common to the Salento cuisine. But there are three products that are typically paired with the adjective “leccese” (belonging to Lecce): the delicious pasticciotto, a small shortcrust pastry filled with rich custard; cotognata, a type of quince jam that solidifies and is packaged in slabs; and, moving from the sweet to the savoury, the rustic, a favourite mid-morning local snack, this is made at delicatessens from puff pastry stuffed with béchamel, mozzarella, tomatoes, and a pinch of pepper. At Christmas and Easter, a sweet almond paste is a must on every table in town.
Trani, 43 km (27 miles) away from Bari on the Adriatic Sea, is one of Puglia's administrative centres along with Andria and Barletta. Overlooking the sea like an elegant pale-stone amphitheatre, it features a recently restored small port, the town's crowning jewel. Start to explore Trani from the Cathedral of San Nicola Pellegrino, a Romanesque gem by the sea. Unusually tall compared to other religious buildings in the region, the Cathedral boasts a richly decorated interior and two crypts dedicated to San Nicola and Santa Maria, along with San Leucio's hypogeum. Not far from the Cathedral, the Castello Svevo (Swabian Castle) is an imposing fortress built by Frederick II. Behind the port, you can explore the Jewish quarter of Giudecca, a maze of small alleyways, synagogues and artisans' shops. Nearby, you'll find the Villa Comunale with its relaxing seafront public gardens, while a mile or so out of the town, there's the Monastery of Santa Maria Colonna. The elegant port, enclosed by the piers of Santa Lucia and Sant'Antonio, is the town's beating heart. Here you can buy fresh fish or enjoy a glass of premium Moscato wine by the sea, before diving into the local nightlife. Trani's Moscato wine, also known as Moscato Reale (Royal Moscato), is the pride of the local wine industry. It's recognizable by its characteristic golden colour, amber hues and intense apricot aroma which is achieved by the particular way the grapes are treated - they're left to dry on the vine for a month or so before being harvested at the end of October. The wine is particularly sweet and goes well with desserts or local mature cheeses.
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Trani
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Trani, 43 km (27 miles) away from Bari on the Adriatic Sea, is one of Puglia's administrative centres along with Andria and Barletta. Overlooking the sea like an elegant pale-stone amphitheatre, it features a recently restored small port, the town's crowning jewel. Start to explore Trani from the Cathedral of San Nicola Pellegrino, a Romanesque gem by the sea. Unusually tall compared to other religious buildings in the region, the Cathedral boasts a richly decorated interior and two crypts dedicated to San Nicola and Santa Maria, along with San Leucio's hypogeum. Not far from the Cathedral, the Castello Svevo (Swabian Castle) is an imposing fortress built by Frederick II. Behind the port, you can explore the Jewish quarter of Giudecca, a maze of small alleyways, synagogues and artisans' shops. Nearby, you'll find the Villa Comunale with its relaxing seafront public gardens, while a mile or so out of the town, there's the Monastery of Santa Maria Colonna. The elegant port, enclosed by the piers of Santa Lucia and Sant'Antonio, is the town's beating heart. Here you can buy fresh fish or enjoy a glass of premium Moscato wine by the sea, before diving into the local nightlife. Trani's Moscato wine, also known as Moscato Reale (Royal Moscato), is the pride of the local wine industry. It's recognizable by its characteristic golden colour, amber hues and intense apricot aroma which is achieved by the particular way the grapes are treated - they're left to dry on the vine for a month or so before being harvested at the end of October. The wine is particularly sweet and goes well with desserts or local mature cheeses.
The splendid Norman Castle is the heart of the historic old town. Seat of the town’s Civic Museum, it features the only existing bust of Frederick II. Only a few steps separate the castle from the Cathedral, which faces onto Piazza Duomo. In front of the Basilica of the Holy Sepulchre you'll find a large bronze statue of the Colossus of Eraclio, while just a little further on there is the neoclassical Teatro Curci. Don’t forget to stop off at the famous Tavern of the Challenge, located in a 14th century palace. Leave the old town and stroll over to Palazzo della Marra, where you can enjoy the rich collection of the Pinacoteca Giuseppe De Nittis, with over 200 works by the famous Impressionist painter. The famous archaeological site of Canne della Battaglia is just 9 km (5.5 miles) away from Barletta. It was here that the Romans defeated the Carthaginian army led by Hannibal. The vine-clad countryside around Barletta produces one of the region’s best red wines, Rosso Barletta, a ruby red DOC that takes on orange reflections as it ages. Made from the Troia grape variety, the characteristic Rosso Barletto Invecchiato is the perfect example of this aged wine.
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Barletta
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The splendid Norman Castle is the heart of the historic old town. Seat of the town’s Civic Museum, it features the only existing bust of Frederick II. Only a few steps separate the castle from the Cathedral, which faces onto Piazza Duomo. In front of the Basilica of the Holy Sepulchre you'll find a large bronze statue of the Colossus of Eraclio, while just a little further on there is the neoclassical Teatro Curci. Don’t forget to stop off at the famous Tavern of the Challenge, located in a 14th century palace. Leave the old town and stroll over to Palazzo della Marra, where you can enjoy the rich collection of the Pinacoteca Giuseppe De Nittis, with over 200 works by the famous Impressionist painter. The famous archaeological site of Canne della Battaglia is just 9 km (5.5 miles) away from Barletta. It was here that the Romans defeated the Carthaginian army led by Hannibal. The vine-clad countryside around Barletta produces one of the region’s best red wines, Rosso Barletta, a ruby red DOC that takes on orange reflections as it ages. Made from the Troia grape variety, the characteristic Rosso Barletto Invecchiato is the perfect example of this aged wine.
Matera, Basilicata's jewel, may be the world's third-longest continuously inhabited human settlement. Natural caves in the tufa limestone, exposed as the Gravina cut its gorge, attracted the first inhabitants perhaps 7000 years ago. More elaborate structures were built atop them. Today, looking across the gorge to Matera’s huddled sassi (cave dwellings) it seems you've been transported back to the ancient Holy Land. Old Matera is split into two sections – the Sasso Barisano and the Sasso Caveoso – separated by a ridge upon which sits Matera’s gracious duomo (cathedral). The sassi, many little more than one-room caves, once contained such appalling poverty and unthinkable living conditions that in the 1950s Matera was denounced as the 'Shame of Italy', and the sassi-dwellers were moved on. Only in later decades has the value of this extraordinarily built environment been recognised, and in 2019 the city was recognised as a European Capital of Culture. What to taste Preparations based on simple ingredients with an intense flavour, which compose a rich and varied gastronomic offering. There are cured meats, lucanica in primis, made with pork shoulder from free-range animals bred in the wild, coarsely chopped with a knife and seasoned with wild fennel and then stuffed into a natural casing and hung to dry. Then there’s wild boar sausage; Rionero ventresca (innards sausage); and then cheeses, truffles (like scorzone); strazzata, a typical local focaccia, and the pride of the region’s production: the bread of Matera Also try crapiata, an ancient legume and cereal soup that’s perfect nourishment on the coldest days, and then dishes based on lamb, peperoni cruschi (dried sweet peppers); lagane, a fresh pasta similar to tagliatelle but thicker, broader and shorter; the cialledda, also known as the “reaper’s breakfast”, a mixture of wet bread, tomato, cucumber, peppers and olive oil.
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Matera
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Matera, Basilicata's jewel, may be the world's third-longest continuously inhabited human settlement. Natural caves in the tufa limestone, exposed as the Gravina cut its gorge, attracted the first inhabitants perhaps 7000 years ago. More elaborate structures were built atop them. Today, looking across the gorge to Matera’s huddled sassi (cave dwellings) it seems you've been transported back to the ancient Holy Land. Old Matera is split into two sections – the Sasso Barisano and the Sasso Caveoso – separated by a ridge upon which sits Matera’s gracious duomo (cathedral). The sassi, many little more than one-room caves, once contained such appalling poverty and unthinkable living conditions that in the 1950s Matera was denounced as the 'Shame of Italy', and the sassi-dwellers were moved on. Only in later decades has the value of this extraordinarily built environment been recognised, and in 2019 the city was recognised as a European Capital of Culture. What to taste Preparations based on simple ingredients with an intense flavour, which compose a rich and varied gastronomic offering. There are cured meats, lucanica in primis, made with pork shoulder from free-range animals bred in the wild, coarsely chopped with a knife and seasoned with wild fennel and then stuffed into a natural casing and hung to dry. Then there’s wild boar sausage; Rionero ventresca (innards sausage); and then cheeses, truffles (like scorzone); strazzata, a typical local focaccia, and the pride of the region’s production: the bread of Matera Also try crapiata, an ancient legume and cereal soup that’s perfect nourishment on the coldest days, and then dishes based on lamb, peperoni cruschi (dried sweet peppers); lagane, a fresh pasta similar to tagliatelle but thicker, broader and shorter; the cialledda, also known as the “reaper’s breakfast”, a mixture of wet bread, tomato, cucumber, peppers and olive oil.
Visit + sea
To visit Gallipoli's old town, crouched on its characteristic islet, head clockwise down the street that leads from the bastions to the Church of San Francesco da Paola with its simple façade. Continue on to the Church of Santa Maria della Purità, the city’s oldest church and home to the homonymous confraternity, as well as a valuable art gallery. As you turn towards the sea, you'll come across a series of religious buildings, one after the other. Complete your way by taking Via De Pace, which bisects the old town, down to the Cathedral of Sant’Agata, one of the best examples of Salento's baroque architecture. During summertime, Gallipoli means the sea, relaxation, and fun. It is also a natural paradise. This is the home of the Natural Regional Park of the Island of Sant’Andrea and Punta Pizzo Coast, a small treasure trove of Mediterranean fauna and flora. More specifically, the island, which is dominated by a white lighthouse, is an oasis for the rare Audouin's gulls. The delightful, sandy strip known as the Spiaggetta della Purità is the old town's only beach. Seen from the bastions, it is one of Gallipoli's most photographed views with the multi-hued sea lapping at its sands. Heading south from town, you'll find the crowded beaches of Baia Verde, Punta della Suina, and Lido Pizzo. This is one of the area’s most famous stretches of coastline, with low dunes, emerald green water, and a charming view of the city. If instead you head north, you'll find another long beach, known as Rivabella.
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Gallipoli
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To visit Gallipoli's old town, crouched on its characteristic islet, head clockwise down the street that leads from the bastions to the Church of San Francesco da Paola with its simple façade. Continue on to the Church of Santa Maria della Purità, the city’s oldest church and home to the homonymous confraternity, as well as a valuable art gallery. As you turn towards the sea, you'll come across a series of religious buildings, one after the other. Complete your way by taking Via De Pace, which bisects the old town, down to the Cathedral of Sant’Agata, one of the best examples of Salento's baroque architecture. During summertime, Gallipoli means the sea, relaxation, and fun. It is also a natural paradise. This is the home of the Natural Regional Park of the Island of Sant’Andrea and Punta Pizzo Coast, a small treasure trove of Mediterranean fauna and flora. More specifically, the island, which is dominated by a white lighthouse, is an oasis for the rare Audouin's gulls. The delightful, sandy strip known as the Spiaggetta della Purità is the old town's only beach. Seen from the bastions, it is one of Gallipoli's most photographed views with the multi-hued sea lapping at its sands. Heading south from town, you'll find the crowded beaches of Baia Verde, Punta della Suina, and Lido Pizzo. This is one of the area’s most famous stretches of coastline, with low dunes, emerald green water, and a charming view of the city. If instead you head north, you'll find another long beach, known as Rivabella.
A natural bridge between the Mediterranean and the East, Otranto is a magical land where the ancient atmosphere of the historic centre goes hand in hand with fervid devotion, romantic sea reflections, and a lively nightlife. Begin your visit by walking along the Lungomare degli Eroi (Heroes' Promenade), at the foot of the ancient city centre. Go past the monument dedicated to the Martyrs, sculpted by Antonio Bortone, and head down the stairs through the Porta Alfonsina to the old town. Take time to visit the Castello Aragonese (Aragon Castle) and the Cathedral, with its precious mosaic floor and the relics of 800 martyrs killed by the Turks in 1480. Outside the town, you'll be charmed by a wonderful emerald green lake set amidst the coral-coloured hills of the Bauxite quarry, while the imposing Punta Palascia lighthouse waits for the year's first dawn to break on Italy. Porto Badisco, Aeneas' mythical landing point, harbours a series of wall paintings in the Grotta dei Cervi (Deer Cave), known as the “Neolithic Sistine Chapel.” A Blue Flag flies over Otranto's sea, with all its inlets and caves. This recognition rewards the policies implemented to preserve and safeguard the area's environmental heritage, as well as the sustainable management of the local territory, the safety of its beaches, the quality of the services offered, and the cleanliness of its sea waters. Otranto also boasts a port shaped like a small bay, where fishing boats and other vessels are moored. Conca Specchiulla, the Alimini Lakes, the Baia dei Turchi (the “Turkish Bay”), and the Baia di Santo Stefano are located just north of Otranto. South of the town, you'll find the Baia dell'Orte, Punta Palascia (Italy's most easterly spot), the Tower of Sant'Emiliano and Porto Badisco.
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Otranto
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A natural bridge between the Mediterranean and the East, Otranto is a magical land where the ancient atmosphere of the historic centre goes hand in hand with fervid devotion, romantic sea reflections, and a lively nightlife. Begin your visit by walking along the Lungomare degli Eroi (Heroes' Promenade), at the foot of the ancient city centre. Go past the monument dedicated to the Martyrs, sculpted by Antonio Bortone, and head down the stairs through the Porta Alfonsina to the old town. Take time to visit the Castello Aragonese (Aragon Castle) and the Cathedral, with its precious mosaic floor and the relics of 800 martyrs killed by the Turks in 1480. Outside the town, you'll be charmed by a wonderful emerald green lake set amidst the coral-coloured hills of the Bauxite quarry, while the imposing Punta Palascia lighthouse waits for the year's first dawn to break on Italy. Porto Badisco, Aeneas' mythical landing point, harbours a series of wall paintings in the Grotta dei Cervi (Deer Cave), known as the “Neolithic Sistine Chapel.” A Blue Flag flies over Otranto's sea, with all its inlets and caves. This recognition rewards the policies implemented to preserve and safeguard the area's environmental heritage, as well as the sustainable management of the local territory, the safety of its beaches, the quality of the services offered, and the cleanliness of its sea waters. Otranto also boasts a port shaped like a small bay, where fishing boats and other vessels are moored. Conca Specchiulla, the Alimini Lakes, the Baia dei Turchi (the “Turkish Bay”), and the Baia di Santo Stefano are located just north of Otranto. South of the town, you'll find the Baia dell'Orte, Punta Palascia (Italy's most easterly spot), the Tower of Sant'Emiliano and Porto Badisco.
The Pearl of Gargano's historic medieval centre awaits to be explored. A characteristic fretwork of narrow alleys, steep stairways and thin stone arches, it's dominated by Fredrick II’s Castello Svevo (Swabian Castle). This fortress, built over Angevin ruins high on the hill, watches over Vieste with its imposing dark brown silhouette. Also guarding the city is the Cattedrale dell’Assunta (Cathedral of the Assumption), a remarkable example of Romanesque architecture. From here, you can set out to discover the town, from Piazza Garibaldi to Piazza Kennedy, all the way down to the marina and over to the Oriental side of Vieste. Here, the area around Via Tripoli looks a little bit like Greece. Vieste rises on a rocky promontory that divides the Gargano coast into two parts. The rocks around here have slowly crumbled into the sea, producing one of Italy's most beautiful stretches of coastline, with hidden bays, marine caves, tall, white cliffs, sandy beaches and forests of pine trees. The unmistakable rocky spur known as Pizzomunno is the symbol of the Spiaggia di Castello, a glorious strip of pure white sand that extends from the Spiaggia dei Pipistrelli (“Bat Beach”) to San Felice and the Baia dei Campi. Don’t miss the beach of Vignanotica, famous for the sheer cliffs that plunge directly into the Adriatic, and fascinating marine caves. The adventure continues on the ferry to the Tremiti Islands.
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Vieste
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The Pearl of Gargano's historic medieval centre awaits to be explored. A characteristic fretwork of narrow alleys, steep stairways and thin stone arches, it's dominated by Fredrick II’s Castello Svevo (Swabian Castle). This fortress, built over Angevin ruins high on the hill, watches over Vieste with its imposing dark brown silhouette. Also guarding the city is the Cattedrale dell’Assunta (Cathedral of the Assumption), a remarkable example of Romanesque architecture. From here, you can set out to discover the town, from Piazza Garibaldi to Piazza Kennedy, all the way down to the marina and over to the Oriental side of Vieste. Here, the area around Via Tripoli looks a little bit like Greece. Vieste rises on a rocky promontory that divides the Gargano coast into two parts. The rocks around here have slowly crumbled into the sea, producing one of Italy's most beautiful stretches of coastline, with hidden bays, marine caves, tall, white cliffs, sandy beaches and forests of pine trees. The unmistakable rocky spur known as Pizzomunno is the symbol of the Spiaggia di Castello, a glorious strip of pure white sand that extends from the Spiaggia dei Pipistrelli (“Bat Beach”) to San Felice and the Baia dei Campi. Don’t miss the beach of Vignanotica, famous for the sheer cliffs that plunge directly into the Adriatic, and fascinating marine caves. The adventure continues on the ferry to the Tremiti Islands.
visit + sea + food
Forming the heart of Peschici is the majestic Norman Castle and Torre del Ponte (Bridge Tower). This tower is the gateway to a magical stone maze of alleyways and stairways carved into the hillside, an area of pebble paved streets and houses that slope down to the sea with their distinctive white facades. This charming fishing town has a rich history. Just outside the town, near Manacore, you'll find a prehistoric cave (now an archaeological park), the Abbazia di Santa Maria di Càlena (one of Italy's most ancient abbeys), and the Madonna di Loreto's Sanctuary, which, according to legend, was built by a group of fishermen who had survived shipwreck. On the road to Vieste, you'll be able to see trabucchi, wooden structures suspended over the sea that were once used by fisherman, but now house delightful small restaurants. There's also a small fishing port where you can pick up a ferry for the Tremiti Islands, only an hour and a half away from here. Marina beach, the longest in Peschici, is a paradise for families and surfers. Among hidden inlets like La Cala and golden beaches like Procinisco and San Nicola, you'll find spectacular natural diving platforms like that of Zaiana, and the amazing trabucchi (fishing huts), traditional fishing rigs still used by local fishermen, particularly near Manaccora and Cala Lunga. Framed by Mediterranean scrub, the seashore from Cala del Turco to Sfinale beach is a heavenly sight.
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Einheimische empfehlen
Peschici
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Einheimische empfehlen
Forming the heart of Peschici is the majestic Norman Castle and Torre del Ponte (Bridge Tower). This tower is the gateway to a magical stone maze of alleyways and stairways carved into the hillside, an area of pebble paved streets and houses that slope down to the sea with their distinctive white facades. This charming fishing town has a rich history. Just outside the town, near Manacore, you'll find a prehistoric cave (now an archaeological park), the Abbazia di Santa Maria di Càlena (one of Italy's most ancient abbeys), and the Madonna di Loreto's Sanctuary, which, according to legend, was built by a group of fishermen who had survived shipwreck. On the road to Vieste, you'll be able to see trabucchi, wooden structures suspended over the sea that were once used by fisherman, but now house delightful small restaurants. There's also a small fishing port where you can pick up a ferry for the Tremiti Islands, only an hour and a half away from here. Marina beach, the longest in Peschici, is a paradise for families and surfers. Among hidden inlets like La Cala and golden beaches like Procinisco and San Nicola, you'll find spectacular natural diving platforms like that of Zaiana, and the amazing trabucchi (fishing huts), traditional fishing rigs still used by local fishermen, particularly near Manaccora and Cala Lunga. Framed by Mediterranean scrub, the seashore from Cala del Turco to Sfinale beach is a heavenly sight.
Bari's historic centre is a city within a city, a maze of narrow alleys, courtyards, historical palaces, and bars. It houses approximately 30 churches and many wonderful buildings, such as the Basilica of San Nicola, the Romanesque Basilica of San Gregorio, the Cathedral of San Sabino, and the Castello Normanno-Svevo (Norman-Swabian Castle) built by Frederick II. Stretching along Italy’s longest seafront, Bari Vecchia (Old Bari) is the ancient heart of the city. Visitors are accompanied by the aroma of clean laundry and freshly-baked focaccia and by the sight of fresh pasta drying in doorways, as they walk from Arco Basso to the area around Piazza Ferrarese, Piazza San Pietro, and the Monastery of Santa Scolastica. Other must-sees include Piazza Mercantile, the Colonna Infame, and the Library of Santa Teresa dei Maschi. Bari is the home of orecchiette, curious little cupolas of fresh pasta that are served (according to tradition) with turnip tops. Bari boasts an array of gastronomic delights, ranging from its fragrant focaccia to first courses made with ingredients from the sea and the land, and excellent local wines. An authentic local classic is the famous ciambotto, a fish sauce made from a variety of locally-caught seafood specialties. Bari is also famous for its crudo di pesce, a delicious combination of raw baby squid, octopi, and shellfish that makes an excellent street snack, and traditional “taiedda,” made with rice, potatoes, and mussels. If you want to spend a day by the sea with the local people, head to Pane e Pomodoro (literally, “bread and tomato”), a famous public beach and meeting point for swimmers together with the Lido San Francesco. There are also many beach resorts where you can try your hand at windsurfing, canoeing, and sailing.
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Einheimische empfehlen
Bari
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Einheimische empfehlen
Bari's historic centre is a city within a city, a maze of narrow alleys, courtyards, historical palaces, and bars. It houses approximately 30 churches and many wonderful buildings, such as the Basilica of San Nicola, the Romanesque Basilica of San Gregorio, the Cathedral of San Sabino, and the Castello Normanno-Svevo (Norman-Swabian Castle) built by Frederick II. Stretching along Italy’s longest seafront, Bari Vecchia (Old Bari) is the ancient heart of the city. Visitors are accompanied by the aroma of clean laundry and freshly-baked focaccia and by the sight of fresh pasta drying in doorways, as they walk from Arco Basso to the area around Piazza Ferrarese, Piazza San Pietro, and the Monastery of Santa Scolastica. Other must-sees include Piazza Mercantile, the Colonna Infame, and the Library of Santa Teresa dei Maschi. Bari is the home of orecchiette, curious little cupolas of fresh pasta that are served (according to tradition) with turnip tops. Bari boasts an array of gastronomic delights, ranging from its fragrant focaccia to first courses made with ingredients from the sea and the land, and excellent local wines. An authentic local classic is the famous ciambotto, a fish sauce made from a variety of locally-caught seafood specialties. Bari is also famous for its crudo di pesce, a delicious combination of raw baby squid, octopi, and shellfish that makes an excellent street snack, and traditional “taiedda,” made with rice, potatoes, and mussels. If you want to spend a day by the sea with the local people, head to Pane e Pomodoro (literally, “bread and tomato”), a famous public beach and meeting point for swimmers together with the Lido San Francesco. There are also many beach resorts where you can try your hand at windsurfing, canoeing, and sailing.
Le Guide ai Quartieri
Bari’s 19th century Murat district boasts many elegant palaces, such as the Teatro Petruzzelli, Teatro Piccinni, and Palazzo Fizzarotti. From the old quarter, passing under the arches of Piazza Chiurlia, you can arrive in the Murat Quarter, the heart of the city with its shops, offices and fashionable restaurants. The streets of the Murat Quarter are on a grid pattern but is very easy to orient oneself. Via Sparano is worth mentioning: it is famous for its shops of luxury goods, such as the wonderful Palazzo Mincuzzi. Corso Vittorio Emanuele is rich in restaurants, a large tree-lined road ideal for walking leisurely. Here you can find the Palace of the Prefecture near Piazza Massari, which is the terminal of many buses and taxi ranks. Opposite the Palace of the Prefecture stands the Town Hall and the Piccinni Theatre with its “Doric” arcade; the Palazzo Fizzarotti is farther on. This palace is the remains of a Venetian work of art dating back to the XXth century and it is a sign of the popularity of Venice that can be seen in many towns on the Adriatic Sea. Piazza Garibaldi stands at the end of Corso Vittorio Emanuele and divides it from the Libertà Quarter. Corso Cavour is one of the sides of the Murat Quarter, at the beginning of Corso Vittorio Emanuele. Here you can find the Margherita Theatre.
Murat
Bari’s 19th century Murat district boasts many elegant palaces, such as the Teatro Petruzzelli, Teatro Piccinni, and Palazzo Fizzarotti. From the old quarter, passing under the arches of Piazza Chiurlia, you can arrive in the Murat Quarter, the heart of the city with its shops, offices and fashionable restaurants. The streets of the Murat Quarter are on a grid pattern but is very easy to orient oneself. Via Sparano is worth mentioning: it is famous for its shops of luxury goods, such as the wonderful Palazzo Mincuzzi. Corso Vittorio Emanuele is rich in restaurants, a large tree-lined road ideal for walking leisurely. Here you can find the Palace of the Prefecture near Piazza Massari, which is the terminal of many buses and taxi ranks. Opposite the Palace of the Prefecture stands the Town Hall and the Piccinni Theatre with its “Doric” arcade; the Palazzo Fizzarotti is farther on. This palace is the remains of a Venetian work of art dating back to the XXth century and it is a sign of the popularity of Venice that can be seen in many towns on the Adriatic Sea. Piazza Garibaldi stands at the end of Corso Vittorio Emanuele and divides it from the Libertà Quarter. Corso Cavour is one of the sides of the Murat Quarter, at the beginning of Corso Vittorio Emanuele. Here you can find the Margherita Theatre.
A captivating place to discover, Bari is a city of two faces with its elegant Murat district and, stretching along the Adriatic Sea, the spellbinding area of Bari Vecchia (Old Bari). Acting as a gateway to the old city, the grand Castello Svevo (Swabian Castle) is crowned with fortified towers. Once used as defensive castle, it later became a Renaissance residence. The Arco del Pellegrino (Pilgrim’s Arch) leads through to the heart of the Cittadella Nicolaiana and its Basilica, a prized example of Puglia’s Romanesque architecture that's dedicated to San Nicola, Bari's patron saint. Nearby is the Romanesque Cathedral of San Sabino, with its baroque crypt. The Basilica of San Nicola represents one of the most important examples of Puglia's Romanesque architecture, which flourished between the end of the 11th century and the early years of the 13th century. The massive structure, typical of Norman architecture, expresses itself in its façade, which is flanked by two towers - the Torre del Catapano and Torre delle Milizie - and which features a striking central door, the Portale dei Leoni (Lions’ Portal). The side walls are finely decorated with elegant capitals, and anthropomorphic and zoomorphic motifs.
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Einheimische empfehlen
Bari Vecchia
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Einheimische empfehlen
A captivating place to discover, Bari is a city of two faces with its elegant Murat district and, stretching along the Adriatic Sea, the spellbinding area of Bari Vecchia (Old Bari). Acting as a gateway to the old city, the grand Castello Svevo (Swabian Castle) is crowned with fortified towers. Once used as defensive castle, it later became a Renaissance residence. The Arco del Pellegrino (Pilgrim’s Arch) leads through to the heart of the Cittadella Nicolaiana and its Basilica, a prized example of Puglia’s Romanesque architecture that's dedicated to San Nicola, Bari's patron saint. Nearby is the Romanesque Cathedral of San Sabino, with its baroque crypt. The Basilica of San Nicola represents one of the most important examples of Puglia's Romanesque architecture, which flourished between the end of the 11th century and the early years of the 13th century. The massive structure, typical of Norman architecture, expresses itself in its façade, which is flanked by two towers - the Torre del Catapano and Torre delle Milizie - and which features a striking central door, the Portale dei Leoni (Lions’ Portal). The side walls are finely decorated with elegant capitals, and anthropomorphic and zoomorphic motifs.
Bari boasts Italy's longest seafront, studded with majestic palaces, while the sea breeze wafts through the historic centre, with its art, flavours, and colours.
Lungomare Nazario Sauro
Bari boasts Italy's longest seafront, studded with majestic palaces, while the sea breeze wafts through the historic centre, with its art, flavours, and colours.
Make a walk between wonderful liberty style building and theatres. Start from Teatro Margherita and go on Corso Cavour, where you can admire Camera di Commercio, a building with one of eight most ancient clock of the city, Banca d'Italia, and Teatro Petruzzelli. Following a list of the must seen Liberty building of the city: Hotel Oriente - corso Cavour No. 34 Palazzo Stoppelli - corso Cavour No. 40 Palazzo Ferreri - corso Cavour No. 72 at the corner of via Cardassi Palazzo Guastamacchia - via Imbriani No. 15 Palazzo Sangiorgio - via Imbriani No.16 Edificio Quaglierella - via De Gioisa No. 55 Palazzo Alberotanza - via Imbriani No. 56 at the corner of via Bozzi Palazzo Acquedotto Pugliese - via Cognetti 36 Palazzo Amoruso Manzari - via Cognetti No. 41 at the corner of via De Nicolò Kursaal Santalucia - largo Adua Palazzo Colonna - largo Adua in front of Kursaal Santalucia Palazzo Dioguardi
Quartiere Umbertino
Make a walk between wonderful liberty style building and theatres. Start from Teatro Margherita and go on Corso Cavour, where you can admire Camera di Commercio, a building with one of eight most ancient clock of the city, Banca d'Italia, and Teatro Petruzzelli. Following a list of the must seen Liberty building of the city: Hotel Oriente - corso Cavour No. 34 Palazzo Stoppelli - corso Cavour No. 40 Palazzo Ferreri - corso Cavour No. 72 at the corner of via Cardassi Palazzo Guastamacchia - via Imbriani No. 15 Palazzo Sangiorgio - via Imbriani No.16 Edificio Quaglierella - via De Gioisa No. 55 Palazzo Alberotanza - via Imbriani No. 56 at the corner of via Bozzi Palazzo Acquedotto Pugliese - via Cognetti 36 Palazzo Amoruso Manzari - via Cognetti No. 41 at the corner of via De Nicolò Kursaal Santalucia - largo Adua Palazzo Colonna - largo Adua in front of Kursaal Santalucia Palazzo Dioguardi