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La guida di Alexandra

Alexandra Daniela
Alexandra Daniela
Bei Airbnb seit 2015
Alexandra Daniela

La guida di Alexandra

Visite turistiche
It is here that the first fortified settlement was built, the predecessor of Roman Tergeste. In 1382 Trieste, worn out by the constant Venetian reprisals, signed the act of Spontaneous Surrender to Austria, under which the city maintained its independence but was protected by an Imperial Captain, and so it was that in 1468 Frederick III ordered the building, at the citizens' expense, of a Fortress flanked by a tower at the top of the San Giusto hill. The three sides of the current triangular perimeter walls of the Captain's House were added over the centuries. The first round bastion was built in 1508, perhaps as a taunt, by the Venetians, who occupied the city for a year. It was followed by the polygonal south-eastern Lalio bastion in 1557, and finally, in 1636, by the third bastion, which completed the fortress. The Castle never experienced significant military activity, and so has endured until today. With its strategic location the ramparts offer stunning views over the city and the Gulf of Trieste. In the museum, housed in the Captain's House, visitors can admire the Late Gothic San Giorgio Chapel and Giuseppe Caprin's sumptuous Sala Veneta. It also contains a rich collection of weapons dating from the twelfth century to the nineteenth. The Lalio Bastion houses the Lapidario Tergestino, containing around 130 inscriptions, bas-reliefs and sculptures that have helped to reconstruct the history and appearance of Roman Tergeste. At the entrance you can admire the original statues of "Mikeze and Jakeze", the two automata that mark the hours on the bell tower of the Trieste Town Hall.
13
Einheimische empfehlen
Castello di San Giusto
3 Piazza della Cattedrale
13
Einheimische empfehlen
It is here that the first fortified settlement was built, the predecessor of Roman Tergeste. In 1382 Trieste, worn out by the constant Venetian reprisals, signed the act of Spontaneous Surrender to Austria, under which the city maintained its independence but was protected by an Imperial Captain, and so it was that in 1468 Frederick III ordered the building, at the citizens' expense, of a Fortress flanked by a tower at the top of the San Giusto hill. The three sides of the current triangular perimeter walls of the Captain's House were added over the centuries. The first round bastion was built in 1508, perhaps as a taunt, by the Venetians, who occupied the city for a year. It was followed by the polygonal south-eastern Lalio bastion in 1557, and finally, in 1636, by the third bastion, which completed the fortress. The Castle never experienced significant military activity, and so has endured until today. With its strategic location the ramparts offer stunning views over the city and the Gulf of Trieste. In the museum, housed in the Captain's House, visitors can admire the Late Gothic San Giorgio Chapel and Giuseppe Caprin's sumptuous Sala Veneta. It also contains a rich collection of weapons dating from the twelfth century to the nineteenth. The Lalio Bastion houses the Lapidario Tergestino, containing around 130 inscriptions, bas-reliefs and sculptures that have helped to reconstruct the history and appearance of Roman Tergeste. At the entrance you can admire the original statues of "Mikeze and Jakeze", the two automata that mark the hours on the bell tower of the Trieste Town Hall.
The Cathedral of San Giusto stands on the hill of the same name, in the heart of the ancient Roman city of Tergeste. Initially, towards the middle of the fifth century, an Early Christian basilica featuring a nave and two aisles, a presbytery with an apse, and mosaic flooring, was built where the capitolium (temple) once stood. During the ninth century, two sacred buildings were built. The first was a cathedral smaller than the previous, dedicated to the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, with a nave, two aisles and three apses, while the second was the Sacellum (Shrine) of San Giusto. The remaining central apses of the two buildings were later covered with precious mosaics, the first depicting the Virgin Mary enthroned, and the second an inspiring Christ, Saint Justus and Saint Servulus. In the fourteenth century, the cathedral and sacellum were merged into a single building by demolishing the right aisle of the cathedral and the left aisle of the sacellum to create the nave of the current Cathedral of San Giusto. The façade is adorned with a delicate and elegant Gothic rose window. The solid, squat bell tower incorporates the remains of the Roman propylaeum. The niche contains a fourteenth-century sculpture of Saint Justus holding a martyr's palm and a model of the walled city he protects. The interior, with its nave and four aisles, offers a striking sight. The Byzantine-Ravenna inspired mosaics adorning the two apses are exquisite. The Chapel of the Treasure holds important objects like the reliquary urn of Saint Justus and the Battuti crucifix, both dating from the thirteenth century, and the halberd of Saint Sergius, which has become the emblem of Trieste (according to legend, the weapon miraculously fell from the sky into the city forum on 8 October 303, when the holy soldier was martyred in Syria). Interesting fact: It appears that the weapon-reliquary is resistant to both rust and gilding.
24
Einheimische empfehlen
Kathedrale von Triest
2 Piazza della Cattedrale
24
Einheimische empfehlen
The Cathedral of San Giusto stands on the hill of the same name, in the heart of the ancient Roman city of Tergeste. Initially, towards the middle of the fifth century, an Early Christian basilica featuring a nave and two aisles, a presbytery with an apse, and mosaic flooring, was built where the capitolium (temple) once stood. During the ninth century, two sacred buildings were built. The first was a cathedral smaller than the previous, dedicated to the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, with a nave, two aisles and three apses, while the second was the Sacellum (Shrine) of San Giusto. The remaining central apses of the two buildings were later covered with precious mosaics, the first depicting the Virgin Mary enthroned, and the second an inspiring Christ, Saint Justus and Saint Servulus. In the fourteenth century, the cathedral and sacellum were merged into a single building by demolishing the right aisle of the cathedral and the left aisle of the sacellum to create the nave of the current Cathedral of San Giusto. The façade is adorned with a delicate and elegant Gothic rose window. The solid, squat bell tower incorporates the remains of the Roman propylaeum. The niche contains a fourteenth-century sculpture of Saint Justus holding a martyr's palm and a model of the walled city he protects. The interior, with its nave and four aisles, offers a striking sight. The Byzantine-Ravenna inspired mosaics adorning the two apses are exquisite. The Chapel of the Treasure holds important objects like the reliquary urn of Saint Justus and the Battuti crucifix, both dating from the thirteenth century, and the halberd of Saint Sergius, which has become the emblem of Trieste (according to legend, the weapon miraculously fell from the sky into the city forum on 8 October 303, when the holy soldier was martyred in Syria). Interesting fact: It appears that the weapon-reliquary is resistant to both rust and gilding.