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Top-Empfehlungen von Einheimischen

Vom Sightseeing bis hin zu versteckten Juwelen: Finde mit der Hilfe von erfahrenen Einheimischen heraus, was die Stadt einzigartig macht.

Restaurant
“ This restaurant named after a soldier - Svejk. created by the famous Czech writer, Jaroslav Hasek. The place has traditional décor for a good old Prague pub in the beginning of 20th century. ”
  • 4 Einheimischen empfohlen
Gastropub
$$
“Fun restaurant with great Czech and international meals for a reasonable price”
  • 10 Einheimischen empfohlen
Point of Interest
“Prague´s classic! We can hardly imagine anything more charming and romantic than hire the small boat or paddle boat and wander​ around the small islands on the Vltava. The island where you can hire it is located right in the center, close to the National Theatre.”
  • 11 Einheimischen empfohlen
Currency Exchange
  • 2 Einheimischen empfohlen
Indisches Restaurant
$$
“ The best Indian restaurant in Prague. Authentic Indian lunch menu has hearty portions for a great price. Many vegetarian options.”
  • 5 Einheimischen empfohlen
Café
$$
“beer beer, gallery, bar, theater, beer ... local atmosphere, sometimes lifemusic on the piano”
  • 2 Einheimischen empfohlen
Light Rail Station
“this is the tram stop where all night trams meet. in case you are in the city after midnight and want to get home, just take any tram (check the direction on the timetable in the tram stop) and go to Lazarská. You can walk home from here within 10 minutes.”
  • 4 Einheimischen empfohlen
Establishment
“Žofín Palace, one of the most notable architectural treasures is used for important social events, conferences, concerts and balls. The Large Hall at Žofín regularly hosts the most prominent personalities from business, politics and the arts in this country and abroad.”
  • 9 Einheimischen empfohlen
  • 15 Entdeckungen
Organic Grocery
“If you're looking for best weekend brunch, this is the place for you. Stylish, cozy and very friendly stuff. ”
  • 7 Einheimischen empfohlen
Café
“Great place for weekend brunch. Some of the tables are old beds from Africa! Look out carefully :)”
  • 10 Einheimischen empfohlen
Musik-Location
“Very nice little bar with cheap beer and cocktails! Also good for dancing. Friendly place with great atmosphere. Often full of young people. Keep in mind that they only accept Czech crowns, not euros. ”
  • 10 Einheimischen empfohlen
Weinbar
$$
“typical wine bar with courtyard with wide selection of wines, from local to international, from barrels to bottles. We recommend to also try typical “škvarková pomazánka” (roasted meaty gravy spread)”
  • 7 Einheimischen empfohlen
Italienisches Restaurant
$$
“Delightful meal with a glass of fine wine at Sapori will make your romantic evening memorable. ”
  • 11 Einheimischen empfohlen
Grill-Imbiss
$$
“It has interesting interior with long bar. Cuisine is ok but they have great Unětice beer, Pilsner too, so you can make challenge which is better.”
  • 6 Einheimischen empfohlen
Nachbarschaft
“Trams Statiom Maniny with tram numbers 1, 2, 6, 7, 12, 14, 17, 25, 26 and night trams 54, 57.”
  • 2 Einheimischen empfohlen
Route
“An oasis of peace and relaxation, an island of greenery in the midst of a noisy metropolis: All this and more awaits you in the Royal deer-park, better known as the Stromovka, Prague’s largest park. This roughly 100 hectare (250 acre) site is open every day to a whole gamut of visitors. Here you will find Bohemian hipsters, lovey-dovey couples, joggers, in-line skaters and cyclists, families with kids of all ages, and dogs with their owners. From time to time you’ll come across a wedding ceremony held under the romantic canopy of ancient trees. Stromovka park has its unmistakable charm and takes life at its own pace. Many of you may have no idea that this park in Holešovice has its own reasons to celebrate another “fateful eight” year. The park dates back to 1268, founded by king Přemysl Otakar II to please himself and his Royal Court with a hunting-ground, and above it, a small Summer Palace. 750 years … that’ quite a bit of history. But let’s begin at the beginning. The Royal hunting-ground’s heyday was during the Hapsburg dynasty in the 16th and early 17th century. Emperor Ferdinand I expanded it in 1536-1548 and joined it through to Prague Castle. A pond was excavated, new trees planted, and a pheasant farm and hunting lodge built, later followed-up with a fruit garden. At the western edge, an Imperial mill sprang up, with a late-Renaissance gate, there to this day. Under Emperor Rudolph II the old Summer Palace got a Renaissance facelift and the original pond was generously enlarged to 21 hectares (52 acres). An island was raised in the middle, its remnant today dubbed Oak hillock – a central rise with ancient oak trees. The large pond was fed from Rudolph’s water tunnel – a technical feature remarkable in its day, still in service. It brought water from the Vltava River a hundred meters away (from near today’s Štefánik Bridge) through Letná hill; the entrance has a fine Renaissance portal inscribed with 1583 and the monogram of Rudolf II. A less happy era for the Royal hunting-ground came in the 17th and 18th century, when numerous military conflicts left their destructive mark – it was picked as an ideal military encampment site, more than once. The modern history of this now public park in the English style with landscaped horticultural sections dates from 1804. Rudolf’s pond was partially filled-in, creating several smaller bodies of water and a sizeable clutch of meadows. The picturesque natural composition was rounded off with the planting of many ornamental and exotic tree species. During this time the Summer House, then in ruins, (since 1849 dubbed the “Governor’s”) was rebuilt in neo-Gothic style; and its surroundings made duly romantic. The Royal hunting-ground areas were joined up by pavements and paths, and the first gazebos, benches, and pond piers added. In the mid 19th century it got its current Prague vernacular name, the “Stromovka” – a loose translation of the German “Baumgarten”. Its final layout was set at the end of the 19th century by the building of the canal and railway line in the upper part of the Park, the tram loop on the East side, and definitively, by the construction of the Exhibition Grounds. The most notable Stromovka building is Šlechtova restaurant, originally the Royal Hall from 1689-1691. The large hall was adorned with frescoes by Jan Jakub Steinfels depicting Apollo, Venus and Cupid, and other legendary scenes. A hundred years later, the building was rebuilt as a garden restaurant by František Antonín Herget, and again in 1855 in the neo-Gothic style by Bernard Grueber. In 1882 the restaurant was rented out by Václav Šlechta (hence the name), who ran it until the outbreak of World War II. His business prospered and it became an unmissable refreshments spot for anyone taking a Sunday stroll. In the postwar period, the “Šlechtovka” became dilapidated, through socialist economic stewardship, and several fires. The ravages of time were topped-off by the floods in 2002. Literally at the eleventh hour this architecturally valuable building got its reprieve, and should once again be open to the public after the refurbishment completes, during next year. Present-day Stromovka is writ large in the civic life of Prague and there is no sign of anything changing in that regard. On the contrary – the Park has latterly seen costly modernization, to match 21st century trends. Most notably, the central part has seen quite a transformation, bringing four kilometres of renovated paths, new ponds, footbridges and piers, several playgrounds, picnic sites and outdoor fitness installations. Additional updates, in the form of new lighting, benches and waste bins, are due this year. Certainly worth a mention are the unconventional children’s playground elements, restored by Prague City Hall last year. These include the original reinforced concrete sculptures made more than 50 years ago by sculptor Olbram Zoubek and his wife Eva Kmentová. The overall effect is that of an outdoor gallery, bringing the public space to life. Not surprisingly, the positive changes in the Park’s infrastructure are reflected in its visitor numbers – Stromovka Park gets 4 million visitors a year. ”
  • 3 Einheimischen empfohlen