Zu Inhalten springen

Top-Empfehlungen von Einheimischen für religiöse Stätten

Kirche
“Saint Neophytos was born in the beautiful town of Lefkara of Cyprus in the year 1134. His parents Athanasios and Eudoxia had eight children and worked in agriculture and livestock in order to the feed them. Neophytos worked along with them until he was eighteen years old. And of course, he did not go to school and did not know how to write and read. He only knew the hymns of the Church and he knew them by heart, because he loved the Church and was always present during church services. Indeed such a sweet desire lit in his heart and a hidden love for divine things, that it was as if his heart had married God in secret. However, his parents, and other relatives, without knowing nor understanding the absolute love that Neophytos had for God, engaged him with a girl. With this development, Neophytos sat and thought very deeply about what had to do. At the end, while the preparations for his wedding were approaching , he left secretly one night and went to the monastery of Saint John Chrisostomos, in Koutsoventis. There he became a monk and because he was completely illiterate, the abbot sent him to cultivate and take care of the vineyards of the monastery. But he had such a great desire to read the Bible, the Church books, the lives and the writings of the Holy Fathers, that he tried to learn how to read and write by himself as much as he could during his free time. Indeed, in the five years that he spend doing this task, he learned to read and write. In fact he learned to recite The Book of Psalms by heart. Seeing his wonderful progress, the abbot send him to serve in the church. After two years he wanted to go on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. There, he wandered for several months looking to find an enlightened ascetic and spiritual father in order to stay with him. Even though he searched hard, he could not find what he wanted and disappointed, he came back to his monastery. However, he did not stay there long. He had heard that there were ascetics living at Mount Latros of Asia Minor and he put it in his mind to go there and search for them. He walked to the harbor of Paphos and searched for a boat to go to Asia Minor. While there, the authorities took him for a suspect and arrested him. They also took away the only two coins he had on him for the fare, and imprisoned him.The next day some pious people heard that a monk was arrested and ran to the rulers of the city and obtained his release. Neophytos, was very upset even after his release, and did not know what to do anymore.He departed from the port, then the city, and feeling sorrow he took a took a path, then climbed a steep slope and reached a very isolated place full of vegetation. There, he found a cave near a spring of water and stayed the night. The next day he said: "This appears to be God's will for me." And began work. He cleaned up the place and with much labour he carved out a cave. Bit by bit he made a cell for him to stay in. He named this cell "enkleistra'' which means reclusive because Saint Neophytos lived as a recluse in this place.Soon the local residents found out about his presence in the area and came to see him, some even insisted to become his students. However, because he loved peace and quiet, he did not accept anybody. In a few years the bishop of Paphos, Vassilios Kinnamos, ordained him a priest and also gave him a student. Gradually, the students became ten, then more. Thus, a small monastery was created in the rocky side of the mountain. At this time, the Saint wrote the so-called Standard Testament, meaning the regulations for the operation of the monastery. Then, in an effort to teach his students and the people, he began to write panigiric and praise writings which were read during the celebration holidays and memory days of different Saints. He also wrote interpretations and analysis of the Psalms, the Song of Solomon and other books of the Bible. He wrote many books and other letters for benefit of his students, both monks and laymen. He even brought the religious painter, Theodoros Apsevdis from Constantinople, who frescoed the church and the Enkleistra, as indicated by the Saint. He wanted not only words but also from images to teach the faith to the church attendants. Indeed, until this day, one can learn and benefit by both the inspired books he wrote, as well as the wonderful paintings, but also from the whole beauty of the Enkleistra, and even his tomb. Because from the first year he resided there, he also carved out his tomb. Indeed, he even painted his tomb with paintings of the Virgin Mary, the Crucifixion and the Resurrection of Christ. And they say that he used to stand in front of the tomb and say: "Neophytos, even if you win the whole world, the only thing which is really yours is this tomb''. When he felt that the end of his live was approaching, he advised his students that after his death and burial, to build in the opening so as not to appear that there is a tomb. That's what happened. After he fell ill, he gave his advices and blessings to his students, and slept peacefully on April 12, 1219. The monks buried their teacher with lamentations and built in the tomb as told. Over the years, it was forgotten as to exactly were the tomb of the saint was, and finally it was considered to be lost.Many years later, on September 28, 1750, a monk searching for treasure was beating on the walls of the Enkleistra. There, he found a hollow wall, and after digging it he saw with surprise and horror the holy relics of the Saint. Immediately he called the abbot, the brotherhood made a meeting, and the Archbishop of Cyprus Philotheus came as well as all the clergy and the local people, bowed in reverence, and happiness and kissed the relics of the Saint. A greater treasure could not have been found for everyone and for Cyprus. A great Feast took places as are great his miracles since then and until today. The memory of the death of Saint Neophytos used to take place on the 12th of April, the day of his death, but later it was transferred to the 24th of January in order not to coincide with the Great Lent. We also celebrate the memory of the Saint on the 28th of September which is the biggest festival in his memory of the two. From the book "FOR THE LOVE OF CHRIST", by Charalambos Epaminondas. Translated from Greek by Ioannis Constantinou”
  • 20 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
“The magnificent and beautiful historic Monastery of the Virgin Mary (Panagia) Chrysorrogiatissa is about two kilometres southwest of the village of Pano Panayia in Paphos. The Monastery took its name from the icon of the Virgin Mary which offers golden milk from golden breast nipples and that's why she is called Chrysogalaktousa and Chrysorrogiatissa. Today however, perhaps out of puritan modesty, it is mistakenly explained to tourists but also to Cypriots, that it is called so because it is named after a golden pomegranate, or because it is built on a mountain by the name of Rogia. The venerated and miraculous icon of Panagia Chrysorogiatissa whο is holding Christ from the right arm is of the Panagia Eleousa type and is believed to be one of the seventy icons which were painted the Evangelist Luke. According to tradition, the icon was thrown into the sea of Isafria in Cilicia by a pious woman during the iconoclastic period in order to save it from destruction. The waves brought it to the little port of the village of Acheleia, known as Moulia, in Paphos and stayed in a small cave for 400 years. During the 15th of August (day of the Dormition of the Virgin Mary) of 1152, the hermit Ignatios guided by a big light, found the icon and took it to his hermitage at the mountain of Kremasti. By the designation of the Virgin Mary Ignatios transferred the icon from his hermitage and build the first small Monastery of Chrysorrogiatissa at the location where it is found today. During old times, the Monastery was a poor holding belonging to the Kykkos Monastery, but it became independent when Bishop of Paphos was Saint Panaretos (1768-1790), who took the initiative in 1768 and built the present church of the Monastery, which is a single-roomed basilica, replacing the old small church. In the years of the Ottoman rule and the early years of British rule the Monastery of Chrysorrogiatissa was in possession of large amount of land and olive trees in the villages of the provinces of Paphos, Lemasol and Larnaca and had two small holdings, one of each at the cities of Nicosia and Lemasol. Gradually however, most of the land was lost and its real estate assets were greatly reduced. On October 24, in 1967, the Monastery was burned down but was rebuild according to the original building. In the present time, the Monastery does not have any monks but the Abbot of the Monastery, Archinadrite Dionysios, is staying there. There is a winery at the monastery which dates from 1751. Today the wine of the Monastery is considered of excellent quality having won several prizes in international competitions. Of great importance to the history of the Monastery is the engraving box of the icon of Panagia Chrysorrogiatissa having ten miniature engravings on the box cover telling the story about the foundation of the Monastery and the miracles of the Virgin. It had been ordered by Ioakim (1794-1821) to the religious painter, John Kornaro from Crete, who was then working in Cyprus. These engraved images are depicting the story of the icon which was painted by Apostle Luke and its miraculous transportation to Cyprus as well as depicting six other miracles. Three of the miracles depicted on the icon box refer to people who were prominent in the ecclesiastical and political life of the island during the 18th century. Τhe first miracle refers to Archbishop Chrysanthos and the Mitropolites of Paphos Panaretos, Meletios of Kition, and Sofronios of Kyrenia, who had in 1783 taken a journey to Constantinople seeking the replacement of the Ottoman governor of Cyprus, Hadji Bakki Aga,who was famous for his cruelty. As the features of the engravings depict, the ship carrying the Hierarchs was exposed to rough waves in the sea and was about to sink. However, after invoking the help of the Virgin Mary, the sea storm passed and the Hierarchs were saved. Τhe second miracle concerns the Metropolitan of Kition Meletios, who was detained in Constantinople by an Ottoman admiral.He was saved, but only after he invoked the help of the Mother of God. Τhe third miracle refers to the Dragoman of the island, Hadjigeorgakis Kornesios, who became witness in both Cyprus and Constintinople to the threats of the Ottomans. However, the Mother of God strengthened and helped him to escape from his enemies. Τhe fourth miracle, which is depicted in the engravings involves a heretical woman who tried to enter the church of Chrysorrogiatissa. However, she was barred from entering by an angel holding a large sword. The woman then realized the error she committed, and after taking confession, she entered the church as an Orthodox Christian, and kissed the icon of the mother of God. Τhe fifth miracle refers to the miraculous salvation of a Christian by the Virgin Mary, who was unjustly imprisoned by the conquerors who were forcing him to change his religion. From then on the Virgin Mary (Panagia) of Chrysorrogiatissa, became the guardian for convicts who seek her compassion and pray to her for escape of arrest, or by sending a member of their family to plead to her for a lighter sentence. In regards to the last miracle, it's about a woman who almost went blind but was cured by the Virgin Mary. Like the icon of the Virgin Mary of Kykkos Monastery, the icon of the Virgin Mary of Chrysorrogiatissa is also covered by veil and nobody is allowed to see her.T he icon of Christ in the Monastery of Chrysorrogiatissa cures leprosy. ΤΗΕ REVOLT OF CHRYSORROGATISSA DURING TURKISH RULE From the early years of the Turkish occupation of Cyprus, Turks settled in the village of Lapithiou, which is near the Monastery of the Virgin mary of Chrysorrogiatissa. They first settled as employees of the monastery and later as Masters, turning the Holy Church of Saint Kirykas in the village into a mosque. During 1794, a revolt against the Turks took place under the instigation of the Abbot of the monastery, Ioakeim. Hadji Georgis from the village of Pano Panagia, who was the leader of the monks and the Greek inhabitants of the surrounding villages, restored the profaned church back to Christian worship, and also captured the manor or estate of the village which had come in possession of a plundering Turk by the name of Souleiman Chaleri and his heirs . The Ottoman government reacted immediately and the uprising was crushed. By imperial decree it was ordered that the head of the leader of the revolt, Hadji Giorgis, be cut off, the return of the mosque to the community of Lapithiou, and the return of the estate to their rightful owners. The Turks did not kill Abbot Ioakim, respecting his old age. The Greek village of Lapithiou which thus became Turkish is currently uninhabited.”
  • 6 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
“The Panagia Chrysopolitissa Church, which is also known as Agia Kiriaki (Church of Our Lady from the Golden City) is situated near the harbor of Kato Paphos. The area, which is now occupied by the church, was once a Roman forum. In fact, Paul the Apostle was whipped here in 45 A.D. The prophet came to Cyprus to spread Christian teachings, but was captured by Roman soldiers and took a corporal punishment. However, it did not prevent the saint from completing his mission and converting the proconsul of Cyprus into Christianity. Needless to say, it is a very beautiful architectural landmark and a prominent Christian pilgrimage site.”
  • 2 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
“A heart warming history of a mother who lost her sons due to religion differences in the ancient times and still maintained her faith in God. ”
  • 3 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
“Stunning view The road to the church meets wonderful places At the beach near to the church you can find turtles”
  • 3 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
“The first President of Cyprus, Archbishop Makarios III started his ecclesiastical career here as a monk in 1926.”
  • 3 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
“One of the oldest churches in Paphos. I photographed many weddings here and it is beautiful. Visit this place and you won't regret it. ”
  • 3 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
“In the 14th century, «Sintis (Sindes)» was an estate belonging to Gautier De Moine, but during the Ottoman Period it was acquired by Kykkos Monastery where a subsidiary Monastery was founded there for the easier management of the estate. The monastery is located in the Paphos district, southeast of the village of Pentalia. It is built in a valley on the west bank of the Xeropotamos river. The Monastery was visited in 1735 by the Russian monk traveler Vassili Barsky and he described it as follows: "It's a dependency of Kykkos from which a caretaker and Monks are send. At the time I visited, there were three Monks living there. The Monastery could not accept, nor could it have more, because of the Turkish taxes. It has very few fruit trees and two mills, one next to the Monastery, the other in the opposite bank of the river. The Monks have several fields for sowing and some animals. They live from agriculture. It has a large courtyard surrounded by cells. The handsome church with a dome and three doors is built with great skill ". The Monastery remained in operation until 1927. After that date, it was abandoned, and in the early 1950's, all of its property was sold to residents of the neighboring villages. The church of the Monastery is dedicated to the Virgin Mary (Panagia) and has an octagonal dome with 4 windows. The abandonment of the monastery in recent years has led to the gradual collapse of several parts of the unit and the church lost all of its decorations. In 1994 the Monastery of Kykkos started the maintenance of the Monastery which was completed in 1997. That same year, the Monastery of the Virgin Mary of Sinti was awarded the honorary diploma Europa Nostra 1997, for the use of good restoration techniques and for preserving the original character of the ruins.”
  • 4 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
  • 2 Einheimischen empfohlen
Kirche
  • Von 1 Einheimischem empfohlen
Kirche
  • Von 1 Einheimischem empfohlen
Kirche
“The church of Panagia Chryseleousa (Virgin Mary of Golden Mercy) was probably built at the end of the 12th or beginning of the 13th century. it is considered to be a Byzantine monument of great value. It is a three-aisled church with two domes and decorated with superb wall paintings from the 13th, 15th and 16th centuries. In the apse is a picture of Christ Pantokrator surrounded by Angels. The wooden carved iconostasis dates to 1747.”
  • 2 Einheimischen empfohlen